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Post Info TOPIC: New emissions standards...


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New emissions standards...


The 2010 model year is going to introduce us to some significant changes in diesel engine technology.... Perhaps out host and moderator can start us o0ff on a meaningful discussion of some of the changes we are going to see in the near future... partiucularly in the area of urea injection and how this will affect fuel delivery timing and the nature of these events (how many 'strikes' at what rpm?) . Will we see a change in compression ratios and will we ever see an end to the HEUI injection system?

I've been hearing about common-law fuel systems and wonder if they will ever become legal?

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Well I can not claim to have knowledge of 2010 vehicles in the first quarter of 2009, however I applaud you for bringing up these new ways of doing an old thing.

I think the new emissions standards are just another way for the Democrats to impose changes that will require manufatures to experiment with diffrent ways of doing things. Much like the first round back in the late 70's on thru the mid 80's when they finally got it right with electronic Port Fuel Injection. Now days just about every vehicle uses the idea of an electronicly controled injector possitioned just above the intake valve to improve fuel atomazation. That with the digital ignition systems and such to keep everything in the best possible range.

Egr systems and Converters have been around since the late 70's and early 80's. So we dont need to beat that dead horse any further.

Urea Injection has been used by Mercedes-Benz for quite some time. I did some research on the topic and here is what I found.

The Mercedes vehicles are using a 3.0L turbo diesel V-6 putting out 210 horsepower and 398 pound-feet of torque, while using urea injection (like the diesel BMWs and upcoming diesel VW Touareg and Audi Q7) to almost completely eliminate NOx emissions. Called AdBlue, it is a solution of 2/3 water and 1/3 urea that reacts with NOx to create nitrogen and water.

The urea is contained in a 7-gallon (8.5-gallon in the larger GL) tank that should only need refilling about every 15,000 miles. In addition to the urea NOx treatment system, the trio also have diesel particulate filters to eliminate almost all of the soot.

Certain features of the six-cylinder diesel engine had to be modified for use in the new models ML 320 BlueTEC, GL 320 BlueTEC and R 320 BlueTEC with AdBlue injection. The piston crowns were revised for an improved mixture formation, and the compression ratio was reduced from 17.7 to 16.5. The VNT turbocharger and engine control unit were also improved and reconfigured. All three of the new SUVs are available only with the 7G-TRONIC seven-speed automatic transmission.

Optimisation of the engines and their combustion processes to reduce untreated emissions as far as possible. These measures include electronic enginge management, four-valve technology, third-generation common-rail direct injection with piezo-electric injectors, a turbocharger with variable turbine geometry and exhaust gas recirculation.

There does not seem to be much about this system from Fords.. Guess its a little too early, but you may feel free to enlighten us all.



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Sir, I applaud you for your research into the subject at hand... The entire reason for your sudden surge in popularity has been centered on knowing the systems we work on.... At the risk of sounding repetitious - if you don't know how it works - what are you looking for?

I wont pretend to have an inside track to Fords future plans regarding diesel engines.... At the same time, we need to consider the advancements made regarding the direct injection gasoline engines (the EcoTech V6 comes to mind) and the relative costs of this technology versus diesel costs - not to to mention the ultimate cost of fuel....

Urea injection may or may not obviate the need of some exhaust after-treatments (notably the EGR valve which has been troublesome.. and not just for Ford). Urea injection has elimination or reduction of oxides of nitrogen as it's only goal. It does this in the exhaust tract using a selective reductiuon catalyst and urea injection.

Now... I do not claim to be an expert in this field... but this is information that is freely available. It is wonderful that a tech would investigate this stuff on his own... After all, it is stuff he will be working on soon enough.  At the same time, it is odd that this tech wouldn't spend the same effort researching the fucking shit he is currently working on....

Early EGR systems were crude... to the point that many techs simply disabled the systems rather than learn them and learn how to fix them. In the mid 70s, the top of an engine was a snake pit of vacuum lines. Some of us spent the time to learn the difference between ported vacuum, venturi vacuum and manifold vacuum.... many "techs" decided that the easy way was to pretend there was no need for emissions controls....

Understanding the systems we work on.... pretty much sums it up, eh?

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Seems your thread isnt too popular Pogo, maybe because no-one is interested in learning, and would rather just BS.

Thats fine I guess... For them..

Here is a good read-

Today's press release from Ford about the company's "New 6.4-liter Power StrokeŽ diesel" engine is not the first time we're hearing about the "Cleanest, Quietest Power Stroke Engine Ever." But, with Ford's Clean Diesel Technology, the engine now is more powerful and cleaner than ever before, something Ford is quite proud of. The company's Diesel Powertrain chief engineer, Rick Renwick, says that, "No diesel engine has ever delivered this much power and refinement with such clean emissions. We didn't compromise on anything."

Using ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD), the 6.4-liter Power Stroke offers 350 horsepower at 3,000 rpm, 650 foot-pounds of torque starting at 2,000 rpm all while spitting particulate emissions "on par with gasoline engines a 97 percent reduction from the 6.0-liter." A diesel particulate filter (DPF) and an oxidation catalyst help keep things cleaner.

Release available after the jump.

[Source: Ford]

FORD'S NEW CLEAN DIESEL PROVIDES CLASS-LEADING CAPABILITY IN FIRST-EVER HEAVY TRUCK APPLICATION

  • New 6.4-liter Power StrokeŽ diesel with Ford Clean Diesel Technology provides an increase in performance with a sharp decrease in particulates and emissions
  • Sequential turbochargers improve off-the-line performance with smooth acceleration through the power band
  • High-pressure, common rail fuel system with Piezo-electric injectors delivers quiet operation without compromising performance
Ford is leading the truck diesel revolution with the first clean diesel engine offered in a full-size pickup truck. The new Ford-exclusive 6.4-liter Power StrokeŽ turbo-diesel is quieter, powerful and more capable, yet it still meets stringent new emissions regulations thanks to Ford Clean Diesel Technology.

The 6.4-liter Power Stroke clean-diesel delivers 350 horsepower at 3,000 rpm, 650 foot-pounds of torque starting at 2,000 rpm and has particulate emissions on par with gasoline engines a 97 percent reduction from the 6.0-liter. It has also been tested the equivalent of 10 million miles on road and in the lab, helping ensure excellent long-term durability.

"No diesel engine has ever delivered this much power and refinement with such clean emissions," said Rick Renwick, Diesel Powertrain chief engineer. "We didn't compromise on anything."

A tough, cast iron block and heads provide a strong, durable foundation for making power and torque. A new cylinder head design and piston bowl design optimize the high-cylinder pressures delivered by the high-pressure fuel system. The higher pressures provide more efficient combustion, delivering increased power and cleaner emissions.

The pistons mount to the forged-steel crankshaft with larger, stronger rods that feature an increased rob bearing diameter. The pistons are galley-cooled for increased durability.

Two sequential turbochargers provide improved throttle response throughout the entire power band with better low-end performance. Tests have shown zero-to-60 times of more than a second faster than the outgoing 6.0-liter Power Stroke diesel.

A smaller, variable geometry turbocharger comes on at low rpm to provide extra boost at take-off. As engine speed increases, the larger fixed turbo joins the smaller turbo to boost power through the middle of the torque curve. As optimum speed is reached, the larger turbo takes over. The system can deliver up to 42 pounds of boost.

Ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel is fed to the engine via a state-of-the-art, high-pressure common rail fuel injection system. Fuel pressurized to 26,000 psi is injected into the cylinders through Piezo-electric injectors. The latest in injector technology can deliver up to five injections per combustion cycle to better control emissions, provide instant response for optimized acceleration and improve cold start down to 20°F.

Dual 440 mm exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) coolers feature an air oxidation catalyst that literally scrubs the exhaust gasses to protect coolers against fouling and EGR valve deposits.

The Power Stroke's engine control module (ECM) has been improved for 2008. Fuel controls and engine controls are now integrated into the same, rugged cast aluminum housing, enabling proper operation of the state-of-the-art engine technologies. The ECM durability tests were increased by two times to insure robustness.

The highly efficient, exhaust system combines engine and emissions-control technologies such as the diesel particulate filter (DPF) and oxidation catalyst into a close-knit system, removing nearly 97 percent of the diesel particulate.

A larger fuel filter better separates water from the fuel, an important asset with the increasing availability of biodiesel.

Keeping it cool increases power and durability

The Super Duty cooling system has been designed to handle extremes. Engineers based the system tests on the F-550 chassis cab's pulling gate of 33,000-pounds, combined weight. Super Duty's radiator has grown by 33 percent and a larger water pump nearly doubles the coolant flow rate from 75 to 140 gallons per minute.

"We have designed the industry's most robust cooling system to provide maximum power and torque under extreme operating conditions," said Renwick.

An all-new engine from an all-new development process

The 6.4-liter diesel is more than just a clean-sheet-of-paper engine. It benefits from a new development process optimizing durability, performance, fuel economy and emissions.

The engineering team began by collecting real-world data from working Super Duty commercial customers, tracking their daily duty cycles to ensure the development process more accurately reflected real-world use.

The data was used to develop durability tests that were more representative of these real-world duty cycles. For example, this engine program marked the first time that dynamometer tests were run with the transmission bolted to the engine during the durability run, allowing engineers to see how the up-shifts and downshifts affected the powertrain during the duty cycle.

The tests were conducted using the most extreme and abusive conditions and run to five-times the life cycle that the hardest-working truck would ever experience, further assuring durability.

"When we launched the new truck earlier this year, the engine had already seen more than 10 million equivalent miles of testing both on the dynamometer and on the road," said Renwick.

The extended testing hours allowed the team to scrutinize every component and system under theses customer-driven conditions. As a result, more than 500 design improvements were made to the diesel powertrain to improve performance and durability.

Powertrain options include the segment's most powerful gasoline engine
The all-new 6.4-liter diesel joins a proven gasoline powertrain lineup that includes the 6.8-liter, three-valve Triton V-10 that makes 362 horsepower and 457 pound-feet of torque both class-leading figures.

Customers also can choose Ford's modular 5.4-liter, three-valve Triton V-8 that delivers 300 horsepower and 365 pound-feet of torque. More than 80 percent of peak torque nearly 300 pound-feet is available starting as low as 1,000 rpm.

Both engines benefit from electronic throttle control, which provides economy and performance benefits. For commercial users who need elevated engine speed to run aftermarket power takeoff (PTO) systems, the "stationary elevated idle control" feature is available on all models.

The gasoline engines feature all-new exhaust systems and newly designed air boxes that mount solidly to the new modular front structure. Transmission choices include a 6-speed manual with overdrive or a TorqShift 5-speed automatic. The transmissions utilize a new, unique mounting system that better isolates the powertrain and reduces vibration.

Transmissions feature all-new gear sets and a three-plate, two-stage torque converter to reduce turbine noise when the converter is locked. The F-450 uses upgraded synchronizers to enable electronic shift on the fly.

About Ford Motor Company

Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles in 200 markets across six continents. With about 260,000 employees and about 100 plants worldwide, the company's core and affiliated automotive brands include Ford, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lincoln, Mercury, Volvo and Mazda. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford's products, please visit www.fordvehicles.com.

http://www.autobloggreen.com/2007/10/23/ford-clean-diesel-6-4-liter-power-stroke-doesnt-compromise/


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We resort to cut and paste rhetoric when we cannot form a reasonable opinion of our own.

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Im sorry, what was the question again?

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Common law fuel systems....

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Yes... Yes... I know what the question was. I was giving you $hit.

I dont know much about the common law fuel system. To be frank I have not heard anything about it until you mentioned it.

To spare you the cut and paste, why dont you tell me about it.

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PogoPossum wrote:

The 2010 model year is going to introduce us to some significant changes in diesel engine technology.... Perhaps out host and moderator can start us o0ff on a meaningful discussion of some of the changes we are going to see in the near future... partiucularly in the area of urea injection and how this will affect fuel delivery timing and the nature of these events (how many 'strikes' at what rpm?) . Will we see a change in compression ratios and will we ever see an end to the HEUI injection system?

I've been hearing about common-law fuel systems and wonder if they will ever become legal?



Talk about calling the ball!

http://autotrend.activeboard.com/index.spark?aBID=91042&p=3&topicID=38966262

We should change Pogo's name to Babe Ruth or Kirk Gibson!

Of course... Didn't you mean common rail injection?


 



-- Edited by SELLC on Monday 6th of December 2010 05:00:46 AM

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