Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Weight Capasity for F250 Super Duty w/ 8 Foot Bed PAY-LOAD Chart
Whats the most weight you have pulled/hauled in your F-Series? [2 vote(s)]

2000 Lbs.
0.0%
3000 Lbs.
0.0%
4000 Lbs.
0.0%
5000 Lbs.
50.0%
6000 Lbs.
0.0%
7000 Lbs.
0.0%
8000 Lbs.
0.0%
9000 Lbs.
0.0%
10,000 Lbs.
0.0%
11,000 Lbs.
0.0%
12,000 Lbs.
50.0%
13,000 Lbs.
0.0%
14,000 Lbs.
0.0%
15,000 Lbs.
0.0%
16,000 Lbs.
0.0%
17,000 Lbs
0.0%
18,0000 Lbs
0.0%
19,000 Lbs
0.0%
20,000 Lbs
0.0%
20,000 + Lbs
0.0%


CERTIFIED POST WHORE

Status: Offline
Posts: 15461
Date:
Weight Capasity for F250 Super Duty w/ 8 Foot Bed PAY-LOAD Chart


Well it seems with spring in full effect the time has come where I test the ole' Fords "Pay-Load" capacity.

Given the fact I am using a 2003 Ford F250 Super Duty truck equipped with the 6.0 Powerstroke Turbo Diesel engine Fords oweners manual claims that-

3.73 Ring and pinion Max GCWR 20,000 Lbs (9072kg) and Max Trailer Weight 10,600 Lbs (6167kgs)

Now it appears that the Diesel and gasoline trucks have diffrent Pay Load capacities and the owners manual appears to have many diffrent applications, for example automatic and manual transmissions, diffrent cab's, however in looking thru them ALL it appears that the Max Payloads are the SAME for just about ALL of the Diesel F250's and the only serious diffrences coming in around the F550 class. The F350 Diesel does seem to have a few thousand more pounds of trailer pull rating but the GCWR seems to be about the same as the F250's. I will say that the Gasoline equiped F250's with engines smaller than 6.8 liters had Payload max's some 2-3 thousand pounds LESS than what was mentioned above. I would imagine that number would deminish quite a bit moving down into the F150 class as well.

My Ford truck had little to no problems hauling 2 yards of topsoil. I was told that two yards of topsoil is approx. 5000 lbs. It was also damp topsoil so I am figuring that it was every bit of 5K pounds. The ass end was noticibly sagging and the secondary helper spring was making contact with the rubber stops. I was very comfortable with braking dispite the load, and performance was not all that effected. You could tell there was a noticable weight in the back, however even with these rotten Michigan roads the truck felt safe going 45+Mph over the local pot-hole belt. No bump steer to mention either.

Gas milage also seemed to stay right about on par, meaning I didnt  notice any increased fuel consumption while having to move over 8 yards of dirt, 2 yards at a time.

I am also curious about the true pulling weight capasity of the truck. It says the Max trailor weight is 10,600 lbs. Now I am sure that this truck could pull way more than that. I once used a Ford Ranger with a 6 cyl. to haul over 10,000 lbs when towing back a Mercedes one time. I must admit it was not the most comfortable feeling, but it did get the job done.

Anyone got any Max Payload stories they want to share?


-- Edited by SELLC on Tuesday 19th of May 2009 03:00:51 AM

__________________

What is to give light must endure burning -- Viktor Frankl

 

 



Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 5
Date:

A max payload story? You bet.... An F150 with a 200 Imperial gallon water tank in the back... FWIW, one Imperial gallon of water comes in at 10 pounds. Anyway, the tank must have been pretty close to full because witnesses stated that the truck was "all over the road" - this was just before the truck crossed the centre line and ran into a car coming the opposite direction. Overloading the rear axle on a pickup can unload the front axle causing grievous stability concerns.... butyou already knew that.
 
One person (an innocent) died on scene and another passed later at the hospital. Three others were injured. I remember this (and many other incidences) well.... since it was so needless and so preventable.  I was a rescue tech on the VFD at the time...

The publicislookingto us for sound advice regarding the repair and operation of their motor vehicles... I don't think that a public venue is the appropriate place to discuss what you may or may not "get away with" and remain lucky....

Nearly forgot... My GCWR is 11,500. I have to be a bit careful since my holiday trailer, with full potable water tank and all our gear puts me very close to my GCWR. A consideration....If you overload your truck and have an accident, there remains the chance that your insurance provider will decide that you have violated the terms of your policy... Given todays economic climate, I don't think they would bat an eye before they threw you under the bus.....

You may want to brush up on trailer brake requirements and load equalizing hitches.... Whoops... I forgot... that's "book"stuff and you "doan need no steenking books".

-- Edited by GrampyJim on Friday 22nd of May 2009 01:22:59 AM

__________________


User

Status: Offline
Posts: 198
Date:

GVWR on my heap is 11,400LBS.

GCWR is lots.

Apparently according to owner's manual it'll yank around 16,000lbs.

__________________
We do PRECISION GUESSWORK based on vague assumptions and unreliable data of dubious accuracy provided by persons of questionable intellectual capacity. Now what can we fix for you today?


User

Status: Offline
Posts: 198
Date:

BTW, you misspelled 'Capacity'.

Your pal,

Hillbilly.

__________________
We do PRECISION GUESSWORK based on vague assumptions and unreliable data of dubious accuracy provided by persons of questionable intellectual capacity. Now what can we fix for you today?
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard