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Post Info TOPIC: Stellar Enterprise LT1 to Edelbrock LT4 Performance Engine Overhaul - Auto Trend


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Stellar Enterprise LT1 to Edelbrock LT4 Performance Engine Overhaul - Auto Trend


Here are some before and after shots of a performance build we have been working on over the past few months. Without a doubt this has to be one of the best LT1 engines we have ever built, and actually it is now officially an Edelbrock LT4.

The customer who contracted us to overhaul this engine spared no expense and it shows. Nothing but top of the line components inside and out on this engine. Proof positive that you can have the best engine builder in the world, but ultimatly it's the customer that makes it all possible. My hat goes off to this customer who is mostly responsible for funding all that you see.



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Looks real good Rex, especially the paint job. Now, as long as you didn't use a roloc to clean the deck surface I'll give it my blessing ;)

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Still a rookie huh?

Of course we used a Roloc to clean all the CAST IRON mating surfaces such as oil pan mating area, front timing cover, deck and water pump mating area. We used it on ALL the mating surfaces except the brand new heads. The deck had already been shaved once before, and the engine was rebuilt from the BARE block. Of course all grinding was done prior to final hot-tanking. What kind of person does not use roloc pads on cast iron mating surfaces? Do you not own a straight edge?

I even have my trusty old die-grider and rolock pad in the background in the 3rd to last photo.

If a clean mating surface is wrong, I don't want to be right. This ain't my first rodeo PowerStroker. I am amazed a Dealer tech such as yourself can not figure out how to use a die grinder and roloc pad. You sound so silly when you say things like above ;)



-- Edited by SELLC on Tuesday 9th of August 2011 04:32:15 PM

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Well, this engine doesn't use multi layer steel head gaskets, so I'm sure you'll get away with it as long as you didn't go crazy with the roloc.  I use rolocs myself on low pressure sealing surfaces ie: oil pans, front covers ect.  I never use a roloc on high pressure sealing surfaces like head gaskets - I carefully hand scrape those with a razor blade. 

I attached GM's tsb about it, which seems to be more concerned about metal particles coming off the disc and damaging the bearings.  Since you did your roloc work prior to hot tanking, it's a non issue, but it's not the only reason I don't use rolocs on deck surfaces. 

In school, we were taught that precision machined head and deck surfaces have small machining scratches in them.  These scratches if viewed as a magnified cross section would look something like this: WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW.  That said, it is expected that some gasket material will sink in to the tiny valleys of the machining groves and become a stain in the metal.  If you go to town to clean it to the point where you make the metal shiny, you no longer have a perfectly flat surface, you end up with something like this: WWWWWWWWWW__________WWWWWWW______.

And yes, you can do this to CAST IRON too^^^^^^^.

The goal is to achieve flatness, not shininess.


Does the store bought version of this engine from the Edelbrock catalog come with roloc cleaned deck surfaces too?  I think not.

_______________________________________________________________________

#87-61-24: INFO. USE OF 'SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS' - (Apr 2, 1998)

SUBJECT: INFORMATION - USE OF "SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS"



MODELS: 1998 AND PRIOR PASSENGER CARS AND TRUCKS


THE USE OF "SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS" -
WHEN CLEANING ENGINE GASKET SEALING SURFACES, AND/OR CLEANING PARTS FROM AN ENGINE WHICH ARE TO BE REUSED; SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS (TYPICALLY A WOVEN FIBER PAD DESIGN) WHICH CONTAIN ABRASIVES, SUCH AS A HIGH AMOUNT OF ALUMINUM OXIDE, ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.
THE USE OF SUCH SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS DISLODGE ALUMINUM OXIDE (FROM THE DISC) AND METAL PARTICLES, WHICH CAN LEAD TO PREMATURE ENGINE BEARING FAILURE.
THE PRESENCE OF ALUMINUM OXIDE IN ENGINE OIL HAS BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE PREMATURE ENGINE BEARING FAILURE. IN SOME CASES THIS FAILURE OCCURS IN AS LITTLE AS 1,000 MILES (2,200 KM) OR LESS AFTER THE REPAIR HAS BEEN MADE.
SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS MAY GRIND THE COMPONENT PART MATERIAL AND IMBED IT INTO THE DISC. THIS CAN RESULT WHEN MORE AGGRESSIVE GRINDING OF THE GASKET SURFACE TAKES PLACE. PROCEDURE: A NEW PRODUCT FROM 3M(R) AUTOMOTIVE AFTERMARKET DIVISION, THE ROLOC BRISTLE DISC*, IS NOW AVAILABLE WHICH ADDRESSES SOME OF THE ABOVE CONCERNS.
* WE BELIEVE THIS PRODUCT TO BE RELIABLE. THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MANUFACTURERS OF SUCH PRODUCTS. GENERAL MOTORS DOES NOT ENDORSE, INDICATE ANY PREFERENCE FOR OR ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY ITEMS WHICH MAY BE AVAILABLE FROM THIS FIRM, OR FOR ANY SUCH ITEMS WHICH MAY BE AVAILABLE FROM OTHER SOURCES.
CAUTION:

TO AVOID PERSONAL INJURY FOLLOW STANDARD SAFETY PRECAUTIONS, INCLUDING THE USE OF SAFETY GLASSES, SHOULD BE OBSERVED DURING SURFACE PREPARATION.
READ THE SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS INCLUDED WITH THE PRODUCT BEFORE USE.
REMOVE BY HAND, WITH A SCRAPPER (PLASTIC SCRAPPER ON ALUMINUM SURFACES), THE BULK OF MATERIAL ON THE COMPONENT SURFACE BEFORE USING THE 3M(R) ROLOC BRISTLE DISC.
NOTICE: DUE CARE MUST BE TAKEN TO AVOID THE ENTRY OF ANY MATERIAL INTO THE ENGINE BLOCK OIL AND COOLANT PASSAGES WHEN CLEANING COMPONENT SURFACES.


THE PRESENCE OF FOREIGN MATERIAL IN ENGINE OIL HAS BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE PREMATURE ENGINE BEARING FAILURE.
COVER OR BLOCK ALL ENGINE PORTS (ENGINE OIL AND COOLANT) AND OPEN AREAS (CYLINDER BORES, LIFTER VALLEY, ETC.) TO PREVENT POSSIBLE CONTAMINATION WHEN WORKING ON THE ENGINE.
VACUUM UP ALL CONTAMINANTS (I.E. DIRT, GASKET MATERIAL, ETC.).
IMPORTANT: ENGINE COMPONENTS, CLEANED WITH 3M ROLOC BRISTLE DISC, SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY CLEANED BEFORE RE-INSTALLING THEM ON THE ENGINE BLOCK.


THE USE OF A VACUUM, SPRAY CLEANER GM P/N 12346139 OR 12377981, PARTS CLEANER, ETC. TO REMOVE ALL TRACES OF CONTAMINANT IS SUGGESTED.
THE DISCS (SEE FIGURE 1--3M(R) ROLOC DISC IDENTIFICATION) ARE AVAILABLE IN DIFFERENT GRIT LEVELS, WITH SUGGESTED APPLICATIONS AS FOLLOWS:
3M(R) PART COLOR/ SUGGESTED NUMBER** DESCRIPTION*** APPLICATION QUAN. --------- ------------- ------------ ----- WHITE 120X GRIT ALUMINUM BOX OF ROLOC BRISTLE DISC (MILD 10 07532 1" DIAMETER ABRASIVE) 07528 2" DIAMETER 07529 3" DIAMETER
YELLOW 80X GRIT ALUMINUM OR BOX OF ROLOC BRISTLE DISC CAST IRON/ 10 07531 1" DIAMETER STEEL 07525 2" DIAMETER (MEDIUM 07527 3" DIAMETER ABRASIVE)
GREEN 50X GRIT CAST IRON/ BOX OF ROLOC BRISTLE DISC STEEL (HARSH 10 07530 1" DIAMETER ABRASIVE) 07524 2" DIAMETER 07526 3" DIAMETER
*** THE ABOVE 3M(R) ROLOC BRISTLE DISCS ARE TO BE USED WITH THE CORRECT DISC PAD ASSEMBLIES LISTED BELOW.
CAUTION:

NON-3M(R) BACK-UP PAD'S MAY HAVE A DEEPER THREADED CAVITY WHICH CAUSES THE BUTTON (ON THE DISC) TO CONTINUE TO TIGHTEN DOWN DURING USE. THIS CAN CAUSE THE BUTTON TO SEPARATE FROM THE DISC RESULTING IN DISC FLY OFF AND POTENTIAL OPERATOR HARM.
3M(R) PART NUMBER** DESCRIPTION QUAN. --------- ------------------------- ------ 05538 1" ROLOC DISC PAD ASSEMBLY BOX OF 05539 2" ROLOC DISC PAD ASSEMBLY ONE (1) 05540 3" ROLOC DISC PAD ASSEMBLY
NOTICE: WHEN USING ANY ABRASIVE MATERIAL, PARTICULARLY ON ALUMINUM SURFACES, CARE MUST BE TAKEN TO AVOID DAMAGE TO THE SURFACE AREA. EXCESSIVE MATERIAL REMOVAL MAY RESULT IN DAMAGE TO SEALING SURFACES.


** THESE COMPONENTS CAN BE OBTAINED FROM LOCAL 3M(R) SUPPLIERS. THE BRAND NAMES "3M" AND "ROLOC" ARE TRADEMARKS OF MINNESOTA MINING AND MANUFACTURING COMPANY, ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA 55144.
PARTS INFORMATION:


PART NUMBERS DESCRIPTION ------------ ----------- 12346139, 12377981 SPRAY CLEANER
PARTS (SPRAY CLEANERS ONLY) ARE CURRENTLY AVAILABLE FROM GMSPO.
FIGURES: 01 ATTACHMENTS: 00
FIGURE 1 - 3M(R) ROLOC BRISTLE DISC IDENTIFICATION 1 - SHAFT (TYPICAL) 2 - BACK-UP PAD 3 - ROLOC BRISTLE DISC
Figure 1
GENERAL MOTORS BULLETINS ARE INTENDED FOR USE BY PROFESSIONAL TECHNICIANS, NOT A "DO-IT-YOURSELFER". THEY ARE WRITTEN TO INFORM THOSE TECHNICIANS OF CONDITIONS THAT MAY OCCUR ON SOME VEHICLES, OR TO PROVIDE INFORMATION THAT COULD ASSIST IN THE PROPER SERVICE OF A VEHICLE. PROPERLY TRAINED TECHNICIANS HAVE THE EQUIPMENT, TOOLS, SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS AND KNOW-HOW TO DO A JOB PROPERLY AND SAFELY. IF A CONDITION IS DESCRIBED, DO NOT ASSUME THAT THE BULLETIN APPLIES TO YOUR VEHICLE, OR THAT YOUR VEHICLE WILL HAVE THAT CONDITION. SEE A GENERAL MOTORS DEALER SERVICING YOUR BRAND OF GENERAL MOTORS VEHICLE FOR INFORMATION ON WHETHER YOUR VEHICLE MAY BENEFIT FROM THE INFORMATION.
COPYRIGHT 1998. GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

GM bulletins are intended for use by professional technicians, NOT a "do-it-yourselfer".

_________________________________________________________________________

 

I know it's hard to teach an old hack new tricks, but please try again.



 



-- Edited by PowerStroker on Wednesday 10th of August 2011 12:14:56 AM

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That's okay PowerStroker, I never considered you to be much of a mechanic anyway.

Perhaps you should stick with rebuilding Saturns,

http://autotrend.activeboard.com/t40831253/powerstrokers-secret-saturn-s-series-fetish/

Meanwhile this marks my 12th LT1 performance engine build, many of them I used Roloc disc's to resurface the deck along with the aluminum heads! They are ALL still on the road today. GM may have a TSB regarding Roloc disc's for use on PLASTIC mating surfaces, along with mating surfaces that use a "plastic" style gasket with a thin rubber seal (such as newer intake manifolds found on Northstar engines) but any mechanic that thinks simply scraping the surface of a head, oil pan, or water pump mating surface will result in anything but a poor seal is off his rocker. We have been over this time and time again. You lack the skill needed to operate even the most simplest of tools. I bet you are the kind of idiot that would try and use a 1 and 1/2 inch roloc pad to resurface a large area, and it's idiots like that who create low spots. I on the other hand have the proper technique, along with the wisdom to know at least a 3-4 inch roloc pad is needed to resurface large areas such as decks and heads.

Given your reluctance to use a Roloc pad to clean mating surfaces I wouldn't ever want you re-sealing anything on my engine. I was working as a licenced and certified mechanic while you were still jacking off in middle school. Only a complete idiot would make claims that thougholy cleaning a surface area with a roloc pad is not as good as scraping it. I bet this explains why Ford dealerships have a high comeback ratio in their service departments.

Besides... Don't you work at a Ford dealer?  

Here is a video of a vehicle that I rebuilt the engine and used a Roloc pad to resurface not only the deck, but also the cylinder heads! Mind you this was 7 years ago and I sold the car last year after several years of hosing it with 150HP of Nitrous oxide.

And here is a photo of that engine before,

And here is a photo AFTER I got done with it. Mind you it's the engine shown in that video above that has been on the road for 7 years with 150 shot of NOS.

Here is another one,

And yet another,

And another,

And another,

And I could keep going on all day....

I think you better stick to your 4 cylinder Saturns, and save your blessings for church. Besides, who want's the blessing of a polygamist anyway? This kind of work is for adults, not children.

You obviously you lack the "Hands On" skill needed to perform major repairs, perhaps you need to go back to school until you learn how to use a die grinder with the proper sized roloc pads.



-- Edited by SELLC on Wednesday 10th of August 2011 12:37:47 AM

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PowerStroker wrote:

_______________________________________________________________________

#87-61-24: INFO. USE OF 'SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS' - (Apr 2, 1998)

SUBJECT: INFORMATION - USE OF "SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS"



MODELS: 1998 AND PRIOR PASSENGER CARS AND TRUCKS


THE USE OF "SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS" -
WHEN CLEANING ENGINE GASKET SEALING SURFACES, AND/OR CLEANING PARTS FROM AN ENGINE WHICH ARE TO BE REUSED; SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS (TYPICALLY A WOVEN FIBER PAD DESIGN) WHICH CONTAIN ABRASIVES, SUCH AS A HIGH AMOUNT OF ALUMINUM OXIDE, ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.
THE USE OF SUCH SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS DISLODGE ALUMINUM OXIDE (FROM THE DISC) AND METAL PARTICLES, WHICH CAN LEAD TO PREMATURE ENGINE BEARING FAILURE.
THE PRESENCE OF ALUMINUM OXIDE IN ENGINE OIL HAS BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE PREMATURE ENGINE BEARING FAILURE. IN SOME CASES THIS FAILURE OCCURS IN AS LITTLE AS 1,000 MILES (2,200 KM) OR LESS AFTER THE REPAIR HAS BEEN MADE.
SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS MAY GRIND THE COMPONENT PART MATERIAL AND IMBED IT INTO THE DISC. THIS CAN RESULT WHEN MORE AGGRESSIVE GRINDING OF THE GASKET SURFACE TAKES PLACE. PROCEDURE: A NEW PRODUCT FROM 3M(R) AUTOMOTIVE AFTERMARKET DIVISION, THE ROLOC BRISTLE DISC*, IS NOW AVAILABLE WHICH ADDRESSES SOME OF THE ABOVE CONCERNS.
* WE BELIEVE THIS PRODUCT TO BE RELIABLE. THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MANUFACTURERS OF SUCH PRODUCTS. GENERAL MOTORS DOES NOT ENDORSE, INDICATE ANY PREFERENCE FOR OR ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY ITEMS WHICH MAY BE AVAILABLE FROM THIS FIRM, OR FOR ANY SUCH ITEMS WHICH MAY BE AVAILABLE FROM OTHER SOURCES.


Do you even bother to READ the shit you are posting PowerStroker? All my Roloc Disc are made by 3M for AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE use, NOT the disc that body men use!

The engines I build are thoroughly cleaned and even HOT-TANKED! All of our surfaces are checked with a straight edge. You would have to be a COMPLETE idiot to make a low spot in cast iron! I could see some rookie like yourself making low spots in aluminum but to the PRO's it's not an issue because we have the proper technique.

Anyone who would replace head gaskets while the engine is still in the vehicle and elect to SCRAPE the surface rather than to grind it with a Roloc pad is a complete idiot! Furthermore one must have the intelligence to cover the area to ensure no debris gets into the engine, but they had to make that TSB for idiot dealer service techs that are too ignorant and or lazy to ensure the area is properly covered and then cleaned afterwards.

STFU already, you have made yourself look stupid! Just think of all them possible comebacks you got out there because you cant even take the time to READ the stuff you copy and paste. You have really out-did yourself this time PowerStroker!

The GM TSB you posted even states "WE BELIEVE THIS PRODUCT TO BE RELIABLE" when speaking of the 3M Roloc pads! You are a complete idiot!

How many times have you made yourself look this ignorant in other forums when talking about Roloc pads?

LOL! 



-- Edited by SELLC on Wednesday 10th of August 2011 12:59:08 AM

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PowerStroker wrote:

Well, this engine doesn't use multi layer steel head gaskets, so I'm sure you'll get away with it as long as you didn't go crazy with the roloc.  I use rolocs myself on low pressure sealing surfaces ie: oil pans, front covers ect.  I never use a roloc on high pressure sealing surfaces like head gaskets - I carefully hand scrape those with a razor blade. 

Guy... Spare us your lack of comprehension skills. You sit here and tell us you use rolocs on some things but not others... You have to use a razor blade to scrape the excess off, and THEN you use the roloc pad to make sure it's clean. If you are not using roloc pads to clean deck surfaces on jobs whereas you are installing the heads with the motor still in the vehicle you are just ASKING for a comeback. Take the time to cover the areas and clean up afterwards, but for gawds sake man, don't sit here and blow smoke up our ass about how you don't use them.

I attached GM's tsb about it, which seems to be more concerned about metal particles coming off the disc and damaging the bearings.  Since you did your roloc work prior to hot tanking, it's a non issue, but it's not the only reason I don't use rolocs on deck surfaces. 

Guy if your not using roloc pads on deck surfaces that still have the engine in the vehicle you are seriously putting your customers at risk for failure! That surface must be flat and clean enough to eat your lunch off or it's a poor job. Start doing right by your customers and clean them surface areas properly.

In school, we were taught that precision machined head and deck surfaces have small machining scratches in them.  These scratches if viewed as a magnified cross section would look something like this: WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW.  That said, it is expected that some gasket material will sink in to the tiny valleys of the machining groves and become a stain in the metal.  If you go to town to clean it to the point where you make the metal shiny, you no longer have a perfectly flat surface, you end up with something like this: WWWWWWWWWW__________WWWWWWW______.

In school? LOL! You didn't have the common sense to know this stuff on your own? Don't kid yourself.

And yes, you can do this to CAST IRON too^^^^^^^.

Yeah, if you are a complete rookie idiot!

The goal is to achieve flatness, not shininess.

You do know that unless a head is warped (which you will know when you lay a straight edge on it) the surface is typically flat unless it's been overheated or improperly torqued. The goal is to achieve a CLEAN surface. "MECHANICS" who use roloc pads to clean a surface area are doing so to CLEAN IT, not to make it flat or "MILL" it. If the fucking part is warped it needs to be milled. You seriously need to realize who your talking to. What you said above "The goal is to achieve flatness, not shininess." makes me think you have actually tried to MILL a head with a roloc pad! LOL! If so I can see why you don't like them, because if something is not flat it needs to be MILLED not CLEANED! Have you been drinking again tonight PowerStroker? It's rare that I get to mop the floor with you this bad.


Does the store bought version of this engine from the Edelbrock catalog come with roloc cleaned deck surfaces too?  I think not.

No but only because the parts are brand new out of the box. When Edelbrock cast these heads they must be milled because they dont come out of the die perfectly flat.... DUH!

You should also know that this engine is not listed in the Edelbrock catalog, or anywhere else for that matter. This is a custom engine with high compression and Eagle rods/crank. You can't buy this engine! You have to have is custom built. Only a hand full of shops will do it.

I see your a little jealous PowerStroker, but it's okay... I too am a little jealous... I can't afford to blow the cash on something this bad ass right now, but just because someone else can does not mean you have to make yourself look like an idiot. I had my days on the streets with stuff almost as cool as this, but now days I don't get out of the garage much. Too many customers cracking the whip!

Let's see what you really know about the LT1... Here is a little question-

When installing a forged steel Eagle crank and H beam Eagle rods what must be the first thing you do in order to prevent catastrophic engine failure? Do you even know?

 




-- Edited by SELLC on Wednesday 10th of August 2011 01:56:39 AM

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clean the lube passages in the crankshaft as always.  I'm sure there's probably something else to allow for the use of aftermarket parts...  Since I generally do stock builds I would have to research the answer to your specific question.

For the record, I do much more than 4 cyl Saturns, I deal in Diesels which have much higher combustion pressures than any little hot rod gas engine you've built. Mine also use multi layer steel gaskets so I can't have any irregularities in my high pressure mating surfaces. Rolocs have their place as I have stated, and I use them when appropriate... Never on a head or deck surface.  Furthermore, I keep a running tally of major Diesel repairs and I'm now over 100 major teardown and rebuilds. (I got DQ ice cream cake to celebrate the hundreth).  I'll put my comeback ratio against yours any day.

Doesn't Edelbrock sell any complete engines??? I thought they did, and I'm pretty sure they wouldn't even think about using a roloc to clean a deck surface.

P.S.  Putz made cookies again, you'd better put Brandee to work doing the same.



-- Edited by PowerStroker on Wednesday 10th of August 2011 10:49:14 AM

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I think it's been about two years + that we have been going around and around on these roloc disc. I know for a fact you just bring it up to piss me off. I think you have that GM TSB posted in about 3 other places in here.

That TSB basically says that the use of some kinds of pads (usually the ones for body work) are not recommended, and it also addresses some issues with regards to the inherent debris that goes along with cleaning. It goes without saying that debris must not enter the engine, yet you seem to think I am some ignorant dealer tech who is unaware of this fact. ;)

Yes I know your a heavy duty diesel tech, and I love pulling your chain almost as much as you like pulling mine, BUT the use of roloc pads ensures the best sealing surface HANDS DOWN providing they are used properly. Roloc pads are for cleaning a surface, not for making it flat.

I have lost count how many "regular" repairs I have done over the years, but the custom perfomance builds take quite a long time, and none of the work I do on them is listed in any repair manual... hince "Custom".

Edelbrock does sell complete engines... But if you check around the LT1 is not one that is often offered for sale as a "built" engine. Likley because there were about 3 different configurations in a short 5 year span. Thus most of the times they are special order. Look around on Summit or Edelbrock and you will find the late model LT1 engines are not often listed as a complete engine outside of "stock". Edelbrock does not use roloc pads because everything they build usually consist of BRAND NEW parts. If they were in the business of servicing and or re-building they would be using them. I am sure their mechanics have die grinders and arbors with roloc pads on them.

I don't know about the cookies, but Brandee has been making some killer potato skins lately. They are even better than the ones at the restaurant. I like cookies in the fall/winter months.

 This particular engine is actually being installed by us also. The customer has also elected to go the way of a tubular crossmember and upper/lower control arms. In addition to that it's also getting some Nitrous so it's a VERY cool project that will be sure to net some more really cool photos. These kind of projects take major time to get them right, it's very rare you see any shops perform this kind of performance work. Not many places will build a custom engine like this, let alone install it with nitrous too. I myself try not to get involved with more than 1 or 2 per year and finding a customer who can afford it is just as rare now days.  

You were wrong about what must be done to put aftermarket rods in an stock 350 engine. The first thing that has to be done is clearancing the block to FIT them, otherwise they will make contact with the sides of the block. It's not easy and requires the block to be notched in some 14 different spots.



-- Edited by SELLC on Wednesday 10th of August 2011 01:41:36 PM

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So let me ask you this...

What machining processes are you able to do / have the equipment to do in house? Do you sublet anything out to a machine shop? I'm willing to bet you do because even at the dealer we don't have the equipment to bore an engine or even bake and blast a block. The reason I ask, is because if there is any procedure whatsoever that required you to sublet the block to your local machine shop, especially on a fancy build like that, why not pay them a little extra to have them mill the deck professionally?

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PowerStroker wrote:

Why not pay them a little extra to have them mill the deck professionally?


As I had already mentioned the block had been milled before. Even after I cleaned the deck you can still see the marks from the previous milling. I think this guy got maybe 500 miles on the other build before it shit the bed. Mind you a machine shop built the engine before and they had all the fancy equipment you mentioned above and still fucked up. You can only mill the deck so much before the piston starts coming out of the bore and compression is at the max now.

You can buy a boring bar for about $1200 used, but who wants to take up a bunch of space unless you are going to bore engines all day long?



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All of PowerStrokers jargon asside,

Building some Aeroquip fuel lines at the moment, but I will have some nice information when all is said and done.



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Tending to the Aeroquip fittings I have found some really trick adapters for the stock fuel rail. Given the math, the -6 AN line should be able to support AT THE MAX 600 HP. For anyone wondering -6 AN line is the equivalent of 3/8.

I feel that using anything larger than a 30 lb injector on a stock rail is poinless, yet with this combination there should be a non-restrictive ample flow of fuel to sustain the nearing 500 HP estimate.

The trick fittings are not like your quick disconnects, they have an alloy body and use an alloy style fitting that actually screws into the fitting "locking" the line in place. It also happens to allow the use of a -6 AN fitting too! ;)

Anyway, building the system is rather easy, clearancing everything to fit just right? Thats another story. LOL

This is where it gets a bit tricky, but you will see how it all turns out.

As with any custom build using "aftermarket" parts it's all about the FIT. These Canton tall valve covers are a bit difficult to work with until you get them seated the first time. Contrary to popular opinion the aftermarket "blue" gaskets can be used, and if you look at the photo above you will see adiquate seal all around the permimiter. These square valve covers make the gasket look funny when installed, but a small amount of silicone is needed in the areas ground flat by the factory. I have found the orange gaskets look about the same when installed, and when I say orange gaskets I mean the factory original GM gaskets that cost about $21 each. They definatly look better, but maybe because this engine is red. All in all you cant take chances with things and its better to pull it off and double check than leak oil on your brand new engine.

These little trick boots shown on the spark plug wires above were recommended by the customer. While they are a bit time consuming to install nicely, they sure do look great and I feel these babies will pay off under the heat of close by long tube headers.

So until next week...



-- Edited by SELLC on Thursday 27th of October 2011 07:09:00 AM

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And here is the 1st start!

Open headered mind you.

More photos to come.



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State of Michigan Certified Master Auto Mechanic +2

Specialty Certified Since 1994



OUT-OF-HAND

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Well I finally got around to getting the images back working. It's been awhile but I can tell you big projects like these really kick your ass.

The job rolled out under it's own power whereas it was flatbeded to the owners home (this back in March of 2012).

So... No test drives for the mechanic! LOL! Prolly for the better because I don't know if I could have kept my foot out of it. It all happend so fast, deadlines, and the fact the customer really-really wanted it back (who could blame him) made for some less than pefect photos and videos but here they are....

Last known photo of the Bad Ass Edelbrock LT4 Z28 prior to going home

Keep in mind the video above was taken by a 10 year old (LOL), but as they say...

 



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State of Michigan Certified Master Auto Mechanic +2

Specialty Certified Since 1994



Rookie

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Hello there UNSTOPPABLE :) I live in Brazil, and i've been dreaming about having this kit installed in my 95 trans am (all stock). I know this thread is old, but i was wondering if you could answer the following:

1- What size of injectors did you use?
2-Did you use qa 58mm throttle?
3- What kind of tuning did you have to do in terms os programming (chip) ? Is it something you could share?
4- Besides the kit itself, what other chanegs you did, and what was the HP and torque that you got (wheel) ?

I would appreciate if you could give me some tips, and help me with my project. You can imagine how hard is to get inforamtion for these cars in Brazil :)

Thanks again

 



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OUT-OF-HAND

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I can't really give out too much technical information on this build, already there are lots of photos but there are things I am sure the customer wants kept under his hat. 

But, from what I see you are on the right track. Seek out the big throttle body and larger injectors. From there pick a company to program your computer. If you got the coin to afford the bad ass LT4 Edelbrock kit then all you need is someone to put it together.

Keep in mind injector size will vary depending on what your needs are, such as naturally asperated or forced induction. Finding the right size is just a matter of doing the math. Just be sure your existing fuel system can supply the needed fuel for the bigger injectors.

Good luck! 



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State of Michigan Certified Master Auto Mechanic +2

Specialty Certified Since 1994

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