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Post Info TOPIC: 2006 Hayabusa


UNSTOPPABLE!

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2006 Hayabusa


Yo,

So recently, the old-girl appeared to be getting harder to start, & I just put-it-down to a tiring battery, as the weather here has been unusually unpredictable down here, meaning not-much-riding on a regular basis, with sometimes a 5-6-day wait between start-ups. And once going she'd start fine all day...

So the issue didn't get much better, & forced me to clean-up the battery-terminals & connexions, with little improvement, but alas, it seems that the bikes "starter-clutch" has worn-out. Of course you discover this after dressing-up, moving stuff, & locking everything, only to find the starter free-wheeling LOL.

Anyhow, after testing everything, & removing some engine covers, all the great many reduction gear-sets still have their teeth on them & seem to be in good condition, so a new "starter-clutch" & gaskets + O-rings have been ordered, & should be here tomorrow, meaning over-night delivery of parts, which is nice.

All up, around $250:00 is all that's needed for parts, & the time to re-fit all the gears-sets & starter-motor.

At 11-years old, & now over 100,000k's, that's a lot-of-starts I suppose, & I'm not too upset about the failure, especially being a large hi-po motor. I'm glad that it failed here at home, & not in town lol, & that it did give some tell-tale warning prior to failure.

The "Starter-Clutch" is not too dissimilar to what you may know of as a sprag-cluch, where it allows friction & grip when torque is applied in one direction, & slippage / release when the torque is not applied, or reverse direction happens. It fits onto the RHS crank-shaft-end, & is driven by several reduction gear-sets from the starter-motor, that lives above the gear-box. It remains in constant mesh with the gear-sets & starter-motor.

Pics to come once the new parts arrive, to help clear the fog !

Cheers,

Rastus

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CERTIFIED POST WHORE

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Man that sucks! Especially after having fitted all them new panels! Sounds like you have the same kind of luck as me Rastus!



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FAR BEYOND DRIVEN

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You found it, now just have to fix it! My 4 wheeler Yamaha Bearcat is having some issues too, probably wait till spring when it warms though.

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UNSTOPPABLE!

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Here you go, for those interested !

IMG_1030.JPG

 

Here's the bits & pieces...Old on the left, new on the right. The old starter-clutch is on the lower center parts-tray, with its gear-drive next to it...( It lives inside the gear, on a needle-roller-bearing ). A new gear-set came with the assembly, which is nice !

 

IMG_1036.JPG

 

Here's a picture of the crank-end & timing-chain, gear, & guides.

All the gears mount with washers & wave washers + needle-roller-bearings in a NW direction, finally sitting above the gear-box...

 

IMG_1037.JPG

 

And finally, here you see the covers, location-plate-assembly, & the starter-motor resting up-on-top. The gaskets come impregnated with 3-bond-sealer, that cracks-open when the surfaces are are crushed / torqued to spec. Adding a little extra bead of the stuff in a north to south direction for about an inch is recommended by Suzuki at the crank-case joins, to ensure long-term oil free out-side cases.

All up, it only took a few hours taking my time to complete, & the bike starts like new again ! And hopefully no oil-leaks...I'll check in a weeks time, after Christmas, & a few more rides.

Ciao,

Rastus



-- Edited by Rastus on Friday 21st of December 2018 05:43:48 AM

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FAR BEYOND DRIVEN

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Good job Mate!

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UNSTOPPABLE!

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Hi folks,

I thought that I should share the good news, in that the Hayabusa has just clocked-in 160,000-km, which is near-enough to 100,000-miles in US-of-A distances, which I think is kind of a cool milestone to reach, since most bikes of this kind don't make it this far in life, often because of a fatal accidents...

For the heck-of-it, ( & after rereading this thread lol ), I'll put together a list of running costs so far accumulated, so that folks can decide for themselves what they're in for in ownership costs of big-bore multi-cylinder motorcycles like this. And to be fair, I've had a really good run so far imo, with only minor break-downs ( in the sense that I've never been stranded or needed a tow, except after 1-accident ), & the only real major running cost has been tire consumption.

For the record, the beast still hauls-ass like it did when I first got her, only sips the oil, & still returns better fuel mileage than my dearly missed RF-900R or GSXR-1100 did. It is far more time consuming to work-on than the RF-900R ever was, but arguably easier to get around that the 1100. I just came home from a 350-km return trip over the top of the mountains down to Bothwell & back, averaging between 90-100-mph most of the way, & still had 6.0-ltrs of fuel remaining out of the 22.0-ltrs available when full. All this to say that high-speed cruising still sees reasonable fuel consumption imo.

Anyhow, I'll write-up the pro's & con's soon enough, but possibly the best part about this bike, is that in over 20-years of production, very little has changed with the bikes being made, even now into the 3rd generation, at least as far as wear & tear items go, meaning that the after-market parts supply is massive, & will be alive for a long-time to come. Most Japanese sport-bikes have a major over-haul in design & build from the factory every 2-4 years, meaning lack-of-parts, OEM or aftermarket can kill a perfectly good bike off after 10-15 years.

More later ;) !



-- Edited by Rastus on Sunday 26th of December 2021 08:41:16 PM

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Here's a quick trip down memory lane, when the brochures of the Gen-1 were made available for all to drool over lol !

The 1st Generation of bikes was hugely successful, & production ran from 1999-2007, with little changes made except for color choices & brake-types over the years...

After winning the crown of the world's fastest production bike in 1999, & into the new millennia, speed-limiters were then incorporated limiting top-speed to 300-kmph, or 186-mph. *The idea was  to produce a street-legal OEM bike capable of a genuine 200-mph off-the-showroom floor, for the year 2000...Which Suzuki succeeded in.

Another interesting note is that sales world-wide for the bike increased year for year after its initial release...This fact of growing sales prompted the Company to keep building them, & sure enough, a 2nd generation appeared in 2008, with minor engine updates, & revised styling...The 2nd generation continued right up to 2021, with the introduction of the 3rd generation bike...

Hassles with Euro-4 legislation slowed the release of the Gen-3 model range, but when released, it also complied with Euro-5 legislation, that has yet to be enforced...This should keep Hayabusa's circulating for a while yet-to-come...Awesome ;) !

 

 



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Nice!

Don't know how I missed this thread where you changed the starter clutch... how has that been working out? Have you had any more leaks?

It's got to be getting nice weather there by now, you been out on the bike? How's that battery treating you?



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UNSTOPPABLE!

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SELLC wrote:

Nice!

1 .Don't know how I missed this thread where you changed the starter clutch... how has that been working out ?

2. Have you had any more leaks ?

3. It's got to be getting nice weather there by now, you been out on the bike ? 

4. How's that battery treating you?


 

Yo,

R1. No problems what-so-ever. The fellas at Suzuki stated that it wasn't such a common thing to have happen, but does happen sometimes to some people. I guess I was some people lol !

R2. The only leak I ever had was a coolant leak from the thermostat housing, that like a lot of modern machinery now-days, is built out of plastic. And after "x" amount of heat-cycles, that plastic becomes brittle, & leaks. Not a biggie, but I wonder how many engines this "in-built-failure-item" has claimed...

R3. I'm out most days, winter or summer, it matters little. I just try to avoid the rain where possible, simply because I've only got 2-sets of riding gear, so I don't like to get both wet from riding in the rain, as it takes too long to dry-them-out in winter.

R4. The battery's been fine ever since I replaced the failing Voltage-Regulator. In fact, when the ambient temperature is above say 15-deg-C, the bike starts 1st time, every-time, even from cold. It's the winter months that you need to have a 2nd-start, & let that Lithium Iron battery warm-through via discharge. You can hear on the 2nd-crank-over, that the engine's turning at a much faster rate, & that's what allows it to start, the increased crank-speed.



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Yo,

So I'll start this 100,000-mile review with what's the most expensive side of ownership with one-of-these-beasts...That being TIRES...I've generally stuck with Pirelli over the last 20-years, simply because for a number of years, I helped-out a Race-Team here in Oz with the teams bikes as their Race-day Mechanic, & was rewarded with their used sets ( typically 6-10 laps old ) used tires, that were usually Pirelli, or Metzeler...These were around the $600:00 mark per-pair, & I got my pick-of-the-bunches for around $100:00 per pair...Cool...

This treat lasted for a number of years, right-up until I moved here to Tasmania from Melbourne, & then I started fitting Pirelli Angel ST's to both the GSXR-1100, & RF-900R. Regular fitting of Pirelli Angel ST's continued on to the Hayabusa, & is the ONLY tire Pirelli recommend to be fitted to a Hayabusa...I should also mention that I use a slightly narrower & taller rear tyre on the Hayabusa, as it brings the speedo accuracy to near-on 100%...So what the speedo reads, "is" what you're doing...Std gearing is a must also for accurate speedo readings. The rear tire size I use is 180/55/17. OEM size is 190/50/17.

Here's what I've used so far, around 20-sets / pairs of tires....

DUNLOP QUALIFIER 4's...2 x sets...One set was originally fitted when I bought the bike, & I picked-up another set as a "gift", (along with 5-sets of Pirelli Super Corsa's) for buying the last new set of Super Corsa's from the local Kawasaki shop, who's son happened to race. These Dunlop's are a great tire, perform really well & last longer than you may think considering how soft they are. The downside to them is their comparative cost / lifespan ratio.

PIRELLI ANGEL ST...10-sets so far...By far the best tires to fit IMO. They feel like race-tires, work well in all conditions, are quite cheap to buy, & are the best when you add-up cost / lifespan. The only issue is that after 6-7,000-k's the rear tire is susceptible to puncture's... This sux...

PIRELLI ANGET GT...1 x set...When I worked at BMW, the bike mechanic there had a left-over front tire, & got me a rear tire at a great price, so I fitted these up expecting even more mileage than the ST's, but I was wrong...I got less miles, & they wore strangely...That said, they worked as well as the ST's, but didn't hang-in there as long...Go figure...

PIRELLI SUPER CORSA...5 x pairs...Awesome race tire, even on road use, but after they got around 3/4's worn, or around the 4,000-km mark, the rear tire would wiggle & squirm due to lack of side-wall & rubber support on such a heavy bike as the Hayabusa. This meant that you spent your last 1,000-k's or so straight-lining on the freeways lol !

DUNLOP Road Smart 3...1 x tire...I picked this tire out from previous use of Dunlop's, as a puncture replacement tire when the Pirelli Angel ST snuffed-it, since the tire importers here don't stock Pirelli Angel ST's...( I import my Pirelli ST's via e-bay usually ). After fitting the Dunlop up twice from 2 x successive punctures, I discovered that it worked really well with the Pirelli front, & that I'd covered over 10,000-km's using the Dunlop.

DUNLOP Road Smart 2...1 x set...After being impressed with the Road Smart 3 rear, I found a set of these Dunlop Road Smart 2's on e-bay for peanuts ( $330:00 the pair delivered ), & these are currently on the bike as we speak. I figured it would be nice to go through summer without having to change another set-of-tires, & see how a matched set of Dunlop's would go, even though they were an older style / design...And I'd love to say great things about this set of tires, but they're absolute garbage, & the rear tire is nothing but a slip-grip-slip-grip affair when fully cranked over...And that's not even with any power being added...I suggest that the tires are really old, & hence that handling issue with the rear...This said, & after 4,000+km's traveled, the rear tire has settled down, & is behaving itself more-or-less like it should. The pair should also see over 10,000-k's according to measurements taken at the 4,000-k interval with just under 5.0mm remaining of the 7.0mm available rubber when new.

So there you have it. At the moment I'm running older Dunlop's that are only "just" cutting it, but should last-out the summer months, & I wonder whether to try-out a pair of Road Smart 3's, or just go back to my Pirelli's, of which I have a pair ready to go...

Hmmm...Decisions ;) !!!

And in finishing, these 20-sets of tires were consumed over a 120,000-km period, since I bought the bike with a little under 40,000-km clocked up...This actually makes the mathematics quite simple, in that we have 120, 000 / 20, =  6,000 - km ON AVERAGE per-set of tires with the above types that I've used...

Reality is however, with the Race tires, you'll get around 4-5-K's depending on compound, & road tires 6-8-K's, though 10-K has been achieved with the Pirelli Angel ST's.














-- Edited by Rastus on Wednesday 29th of December 2021 04:10:51 AM

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Yo,

Oil...No doubt you can imagine that I've changed the oil a few times whilst enjoying the pleasures of this beast. For the last 25-years or so I've always used Shell oils, since I discovered a silky smooth gear-box shift by using it. This happened by chance, whilst working at a smaller MB outfit in Melbourne, where I changed the oil-out on the RF-900R, & couldn't believe difference.

Anyhow, once the economic stresses started happening because of Corona, the price of Shell-oils virtually doubled overnight, & so I swapped over to an Australian manufactured oil, called Gulf-Western, with extremely satisfying results, & at very reasonable pricing. Anyhow, here's the deal...

Suzuki wants you to change your oil-out every 6,000-km's, & with a filter change every 18,000-km. "Proper" motorcycle oils are VERY expensive to purchase at around $70:00 AUD for a quart of say REPSOL 10W-40. The difference between motorcycle oils & regular oils is that they have additives that prolong the oils life, due to the harsh environment that the straight-cut-gears, in constant mesh, in the gear-box section of the crank-case impose on the oil. The remedy here is obviously the use of synthetics.

So here's the problem, there's plenty of oils out there claiming to be "Semi-Synthetic", but how much "Synthetic" oil is actually in the container ???...To this day, I've not been able to find what percentage of synthetic oil mixed with regular oil, allows for the legal claims of its branding of being a semi-synthetic. Check it out for yourself, & you'll likely get no-where.

I have read lab-reports however via author & successful engine builder " Mr. David Vizard ", that his tests using Mobil-1 full synthetic oil, when blended with regular oil, at a blend of 25% full synthetic oil, yields around 95% of the protection of a full-synthetic oil. Good enough for me, & that's what I've done for 20+ years...

The Hayabusa's oil-change capacity is a weird 3.1-ltrs without a filter, & 3.3-ltrs with a filter. Here in Australia, oil is generally packaged in 5.0-ltr containers...So I've been blending this way...

*2.5-ltrs of Gulf-Western 10W-40 semi-sythetic & O.5-lts of Gulf-Western full-synthetic 5W-30, +100ml of Nulon E-30 PTFE long-life engine additive during summer. And 100mls of 10W-40 during the winter months, or 300mls as needed at a filter change interval.

* I used to 1/2 the Suzuki recommended change interval, & change it out at 3,000-km intervals, but the Gulf-Western oil handles the load better than Shell imo, & I've extended it to 4,000-km intervals, when gauged from the clear-coca-cola color emptying out.

This mixing of oils has done no harm whatsoever, as the 220,000-Km's traveled by my late FR900R, & currently with the Hayabusa, as the long-engine-life is displaying. I've never had to replace a clutch assy in either of these bikes, or the 1100 for that matter.

If you want to add-up costs here's the numbers as we speak in AUD...

Shell HX-7, semi-synth, 10W-40 = $54:00 for 5.0-ltrs.

Shell HX-8, full-synth, 5W-30 = $79:00 for 5.0-ltrs.

Gulf-Western, semi-synth, 10W-40 = $34:00 for 5.0-ltrs.

Gulf-Western, full synth, 5W-40 = $50:00 for 5.0-ltrs.

Nulon E-30 is essentially the old "Slick-50", but made in Australia, & can be bought for around the $30-40:00 dollar mark for 500-mls. I highly recommend its use ;) !

Gulf-Western oils are used by a great many mining companies around Australia, & their equipment is valued in millions & millions of dollars, so it's good oil.

*The GSXR-1100 gets the same treatment, but has a 4.0-ltr sump capacity. The RF900R had 3.3-ltr capacity...

So...How much does the Hayabusa drink of that oil ?....I personally believe that the sump capacity is too-small for an engine of 1299cc's, so the oil gets a hard time, & it's best is gone around the 2,500-km mark. The oil then thins out further, & is consumed a little-more by the engine. I generally top-up around 100 mls ( winter ) & 200mls ( summer) at the 2,000-km mark, & pull out an easy full 3.0-ltrs at oil-change time.

With such a small sump & oil capacity, I recommend regular viewing of the sight-glass, & 100-mls of oil brings it up from the low-mark to full. And don't forget either that synthetic oils do evaporate over time, & all engines are designed to drink a little oil.












-- Edited by Rastus on Friday 31st of December 2021 06:19:53 PM

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Issues along the way...

Fuel pump.

* The Fuel Pump died around the 100,000-km mark, & Suzuki wanted around $900:00 AUD to fix the issue. Though parts in the assembly are listed separately & with part-numbers, only a complete assy with filter & sender unit could be bought going the OEM route...Thankfully, Whites-moto-spares had a pump for me at around the $90:00 AUD mark, & is still going to this day. It also has a much deeper & louder working growl than the OEM unit ever did.

It's also possible to clean out the fuel filter via reverse flowing, & using of a can of "carby-cleaner". The filters-outlet-port is tricky to access, & though round, is enclosed in a triangular & deep recess, but you can punch-a-hole in a PPE squashable-ear-plug length-wise, & then run your carby-cleaner extension-nozzle through it. You then squash the ear-plug, fit-it through the fuel-outlet, & let it expand to seal-up the hole. You then blast through the carby-cleaner in short bursts until full, to clear-out the filter assy. You'll be amazed at how much crap comes-out, & be warned, as it squirts right back at you lol, so identify the inlet & outlet ports first, & be aware of the spray coming back at you. About 1/2-the-can will do the trick, with nothing but clear fluid exiting after this amount. You can then blow through some air, if you have a nozzle that will seal up & reach into the outlet, but carby-cleaner evaporates real quick, & clean fluid coming out is a good indicator & means it's pretty clean & a blow-through with air, not really necessary.

The aftermarket is huge of course, but remember that there is always a delay in getting your parts, so I figure that for less than $100:00, you might as-well grab your next pump, & have it handy, as you never know when a pump will crap-out on you.

For those that like "Bosch" in anything to do with fuel systems, the pump that fits the Hayabusa, is part number "#69420", & seems quite popular as a replacement pump.



-- Edited by Rastus on Sunday 2nd of January 2022 07:42:41 PM

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Wheel bearings...

Apparently the Hayabusa is known for having failing rear-wheel-bearings. I've been lucky, & the 3 x bearings in the rear-wheel are still in great working order. ( 2-bearings are for the wheel itself, the other for the rear-sprocket assy).

The front wheel bearings were a different matter however, & I'm on my 3-rd set...When the 1st set failed, I decided to take it to the Kawasaki repair shop, since they were nice-folks, & the business is on my-side-of-town, so I didn't have to drive through town to get to Suzuki.( For those that don't know, as the corporate pyramid climbs to the top, you'll find that Kawasaki & Suzuki are one-&-the-same, at least as far as where the profits go lol )...Also, I wanted to check-out what Bearing-remover-tool the pro's use here, so I could get a tool for myself next-time.

Anyhow, the tool they used to remove the bearing was nothing more than an 12" piece of hardened round steel, of around 20mm diameter, with a very carefully chamferred lip ground into it at one end, of less than 1-mm thickness, so as to access the gap between the bearing & spacer, like a wedge. To say I was disappointed about the special-tool ( lol ) was an understatement, but more disappointing was the failure of the new wheel-bearings fitted, around 30,000-k's later...Upon looking into the matter, it seems that these "nice folks" sprayed mag-wheel-cleaner or similar into the bearing assy's after fitting them up. I saw them do this with my own eye's at the time, & wondered why they're cleaning my wheel after fitting said bearings, spraying the axel-well with this stuff.

The things some red-necks do, to keep you coming back again....

Anyhow, I bought a beautiful & simplistic wheel-bearing remover tool from e-bay for around $30:00, & I can do this all myself now. It has multiple tool-bits & covers all general sizes up to 26-mm, but I'll have to grab another separate bit/tool for the rear bearings, as they're 32mm inside diameter.

The tool is stupid-simple to use & works 100%, with no damage to anything, & limited tapping of a hammer required since the tool by-design, self centers, & evenly removes the bearings with a few light-taps of a hammer.

I was charged around $100:00 AUD for parts & labor from the Kawasaki bike-shop, & their dodgy workmanship...

The bearing-tool & new bearings were less than $60:00 combined, with the new SKF bearings holding-up well, over 30,000-ks on-wards, & at $14:00 AUD each.

Also, how do you tell when the front wheel bearings are going to fail ?...The first tell-tale you'll get is with your front brake-lever, in that you can pump-it-up, & it has short-travel to activate the brakes. Then, you go for a ride, & find that the travel-length of the lever has increased substantially, leaving you thinking that there's some air in the brake-fluid, that you haven't evacuated. What happens is that because the bearings are worn, the wheel can move from left-to-right on its axis when your riding, & this action allows the front-discs to move, & gently push-back on your brake-pads, which then causes the greater lever travel needed to activate the brakes...More advanced wear tell-tales are hearing like a brake-pad-squeal when riding along, & of course, tapping the brake lever relieves the noise for a short time, since you've re-centered the wheel again. When they're ready to let go-for good, you'll hear a snatch & grab type sound, which means that the balls are being spat-out lol !

So...The lesson learned, is that your friendly Kawasaki bike repair shop, who's family owned, & who's family all race motorcycles, have their own best interests at heart, & they make sure that the parts that they fit-up, fail early, so you keep coming back...And all done with a big smile on their face ;) !












-- Edited by Rastus on Monday 3rd of January 2022 07:52:39 PM

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Brake Pads.

I'm currently on my 4-th set of pads. I replace both front & rear pads at the same time on this bike, as they wear-out pretty evenly. Interestingly, the RF900R & the GSXR-1100 would see me change the rear-pad-set out at least twice, to one pair of front pads.

Problems with the pads is that OEM parts are extraordinarily expensive, & you wouldn't see much change out of $300:00 for a full front & rear set purchase...Another problem is that often your bike-shop won't have a wide variety of after-market pads to fit-up, so you'll have no choice but to fit-up what they have on the shelf, & you'll find yourself parting with around $150:00 for a less-than-perfect replacement set. And the next time you go for a replacement set, there'll be another "unknown" brand to use...

*Avoid using "Ferodo" pads, they're garbage. They have reasonable initial bite, but after that, it doesn't matter how hard you pull on the lever, you won't be stopping any faster.

Anyhow, the first replacement set I fitted-up, were a full-set of "DP" branded pads. They worked quite well, but were lucky to last-out 12-months for your $150:00...

The next full-set fitted were "Nissin" branded, & I was very pleased with the results, especially when knowing that "Nissin" is an OEM supply-brand, & the calipers fitted to my bike are also "Nissin" branded. These babies worked as-well as the "DP's", but lasted over 2-years...However, when I went back to the Kawasaki bike-shop for the next replacement set, they weren't available, but they "might" be able to order some in...Needless to say, I searched on e-bay...

The first hit on e-bay was laughable, a brand called "XYZ" offered both a full front & rear set of pads for $42:00, delivered...And after searching for my all-time-favorite brand "Carbon Lorrain" with no success, I decided to try-out the "XYZ", as a stop-gap, until something else came up.

These "XYZ's" are still on my bike after over 12-months, & look like seeing out easily the 2-year mark, & they work very surprisingly well, matching & possibly exceeding the performance of all the other brake-pad-types used so far, at least as far as road-riding goes...And at over $100:00 cheaper than anything else I've used over the years, go figure...

( Also, regarding the last post on wheel-bearings, I shouldn't be so hard on the Kawasaki folks, as you never know, everyone makes mistakes, & theirs could have been honest ones...Hmmm...)

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Chain & sprockets

These items should be all changed-out at the same time, & if you regularly lube the chain, you can expect a life-span of around 60-70,000-km, before an unsettling snatch begins to appear in your ultra-smooth drive-train. What usually happens, is that the "O'"-rings fitted to the chain will have thinned-out, & possibly cracked & been thrown away, that then allows water / dirt into the pin-section, & corrosion starts. This corrosion then allows the pin to move into the side-plates, essentially lengthening the chain-link. And then this longer chain-link wants to climb the sprocket, & snatches itself away as the wheel rolls along in normal operation.

Most chains used to come with a pair of "master-links", offering you the choice between using a "clip-retainer", or a retainer that has to be peened after fitting with a chain-tool. Most chain-tools come with provisions to turn them into chain-breakers, & chain peening tools in one, allowing for precise fitting. Now-days however, you'll find that the "clip retainer" master-link is not supplied, so you'll need to grab a chain- tool for doing this at home. And an angle-grinder will also be needed to grind-off the chains pins on one link, so that the chain-tool can then push the remaining pin out, to split the chain. I then feed the new chain on whilst linking it up onto the old-chain, & rotating the rear wheel around after having already fitted-up the sprockets.

There's a wide array of after-market kits available, & all will generally be reputable brands that offer these kits for such a high-powered bike as this. It's always recommended that brands like DID, RK, & similar be used, & that a 530 chain minimum is specified. Expect to pay around $150:00 for a decent "O"-ring chain.

Sprockets need only be a matched-pair for even wear characteristics, & can be found for around "a-dollar-a-tooth", & I suggest using the standard gearing of 17 / 40 for speedo accuracy, since the speedo-sensor takes its readings from the front sprocket. When I first got the bike, it really hauled-ass as it had a 16-tooth front sprocket fitted, but speedo errors of around 10% were experienced. The std gearing still allows the bike to haul-ass, but the throttle-response is not as edgy, & a little more forgiving.

There's also lots of different spray-lube for your chain available, but you don't need to buy a $50:00 can of stuff from the bike-shop...I use CRC White Lithium Grease with awesome results, & re-lubes only needed after 5-600-km traveled. The white grease turns black after use, & when the chain-link-beads are shiny again, give it & the o-rings another spray. This stuff is all-of $15:00 a can, & can be used as engine-rebuild-lube too, among many other uses.

So that's about it here, & a little over $200:00 AUD will keep you going for another 60-odd-thousand km.



-- Edited by Rastus on Tuesday 4th of January 2022 06:54:12 PM

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Light bulbs etc...

Being a 1st-generation bike, Suzuki still used traditional incandescent globes on this beast, & things like the rear indicator stalk assy's, were essentially carry-overs from at least another dozen models or so, that used the same part. This is great, because even in the after-market, you'll find variances in prices if you need to replace one, as one model will be priced differently to another, even though the part is identical. The reason I mention this, is that OEM pricing may be $80:00+ for a single assy ( and then you have one new one, & one old one lol, so then you need a second to keep-up appearances ), but you can source these for around $20:00 each through places like Whites...And these plastic indicator-stalks can also easily separate from the metal-toothed-washer-like fixing point, without necessarily being in an accident. I have plenty of spares from both the RF900R & GSXR-1100, as they're identical...And on the RF & 1100, they used them on the front too, but with a shorter stem when compared to the rear, so customizing is possible...

I've found that corrosion in the globe-socket is the primary cause of globe failure, since a poor earth connexion is created, & not failure of the globes themselves. The simple fix to slow this process down, is a spraying of the good-o'l CRC 5.56 ;) ! And since this circuit is by design, part of a greater intergrated-circuit, other "gremlin" electrical issues may present themselves, that come & go...So spray that CRC in these globe sockets to keep gremlins away ! In fact, spraying CRC in every electrical plug connexion is very much worth your while doing ;) !

The only other thing worth mentioning, is that with the "jelly-bean" headlight assy, the low & high beam sections have individual globes. I've only had to replace the one headlamp globe so-far, & was shocked to discover that Suzuki wanted $99:00 for a replacement globe...Needless to say, that I went to the local "Super Cheap Auto" & grabbed one "H-7" for around $06:00, & it's still working to this day, at least 3-years later...I thought I'd be changing them out more often, since about 1995, regulations stated that a motorcycle must be hard-wired to have at least low-beam on, along with tail-lights, whenever the bike is running. This also means more load on the battery during start-ups, but it is what it is...

Fitting the headlamp globes is also a tricky pain-in-the-ass, but can be done with either the removal of the LHS inner black-plastic panel, or by working from underneath, on-your-back, in-between the fork-legs, with only the one cover to remove.

Should anyone wish to go the LED route, there's plenty of stuff offered, but a change in the indicator flasher relay / unit is needed due to the new & different loading requirements.















-- Edited by Rastus on Wednesday 5th of January 2022 07:23:34 PM

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Spark-plugs...

The spark-plugs are ignited via the coil-over-plug system, meaning no leads to ever change-out. This issue here will be heat causing the embrittlement of the plug-in wiring connectors, & you must carefully place these connectors within the engines cavity, between the camshafts, as they'll be crushed otherwise, when the fuel-tank comes to rest. There's also a rubber-heat-shield that rests on the rocker-cover that will need re-aligning after changing the plugs out, & liberal use of the good-o'l CRC 5.56 within the coils & its wiring connectors will see years of trouble-free use, & keep corrosion at bay.

There are platinum-type-plugs available for use, that last a long time, but I recommend the use of the regular NGK CR9E plugs, for two-reasons. 1. Regular change-outs means that the plugs give you the tell-tale of how the engine is wearing, & fuel system function, by the deposits left on them. 2. Regular change-out means that the coils & connectors see that important CRC 5.56 get sprayed onto them, virtually guaranteeing that they'll last, & slip-off easily without breakage.

Suzuki recommend a change-out every 12,000-km of the CR9E plugs, but I get no problems with a 20,000-km change-out, with the plugs easily making this distance traveled. They'd easily go longer, but you have to make a decision, & 20,000-k's is when my beast see's it's "major service" being carried out, so that's when these plugs get refreshed. They're gapped at the factory to 0.7mm, but I close them up a little to 0.65mm, so that they see-out the time-frame without over reaching the coils capability to spark, as the center electrode wears down, & this gap widens...

Spark-plug prices are crazy down this way, with the average price being around $06:50 per-plug, but I've found a place that'll sell them to me at a more reasonable $04:00 a plug. It wasn't so long ago that I was paying $02:00 per-plug when I bought a box of 10, so I don't know what's happened here with this crazy pricing scam...Especially when your local motorcycle shop will happily sell each plug to you for $17:50 each...

As you can see from previous posts, you're not just going to save pennies by shopping around, you're going to save lots of your hard-earned ;) !

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The Ignition Switch...

This component was always a little dodgy on my bike, namely due to the barrel being worn when I bought it, & the key flying-out-of-it ( unbeknownst to me ) somewhere between Lightning Ridge & Walgott, in NSW when I first brought it down from QLD lol ! Anyhow, at some point, the ignition switch will play-up in other ways, often electrically, & the problem isn't the switch itself, but the breaking of the wires that feed into it via the loom. The big problems out there is these...

* Every wiring diagram on the net is incorrect.

* Suzuki also change the wiring colors at loom connexions, meaning an Orange wire with a Green tracer going into a connector / plug, comes out any color they choose, to feed a different system, & then may come back to the original color at the next connector / plug, if it even travels that far.

* Spending-up around $140:00 for the OEM manual & a few weeks wait will rectify the diagram problem for future events, as every update & wiring diagram is included, for every model made. This is also the thickest manual I've ever bought, & there's countless fold-out wiring diagrams within it. Money well spent here ;) !

The issue I had was losing my tail-lights & indicator function, & all the usual visual checks & multi-meter circuit tests indicated that all was well. The fuse was also good. And after looking at a wiring diagram off-the-net, discovered that the flasher-relay also operates other circuits too, such as the side-stand immobilizer, that also had the same color wires as the failed lighting circuit. Relays aren't cheap, & didn't fix my problem, but I managed to exchange the OEM relay that I bought for $120:00 for a new ignition switch assy ( & another $50:00 ), since I could prove that it was still new, & didn't have any power applied to it with the wiring diagram I made-up myself. And with my home-made diagram, I came to the conclusion that if I by-passed the ignition-switch assy with a paper-clip at its connector / plug, I should have my lights & indicators back if I bridged "these two wires together", & it worked, & is still working to this day, as I insulated it, & made sure that my power-feed wire is fused.

Now its summer, I'll get around to fitting the new switch-up, once the strange weather settles down, & give everything a good clean-up...The main reason for being so slack in this matter, (since I've had the new keys & ignition-switch for a few months now), is the keys themselves...Even though Suzuki was given the build-date / VIN / & engine numbers, the ignition assy will fit up, but the new key won't open the gas-tank, or the trunk-lid...In-fact, I'll need to carry-around 3-keys if I want to access these components on the same day...

Suzuki does offer a one-key-works-all kit, where a new Ignition switch, along with a Fuel Tank assy, & Trunk-lid key-barrel are offered, but this kit is around the $500:00 AUD mark, so I'll be contented ( if a little frustrated ) with using 3-different keys lol !



-- Edited by Rastus on Friday 7th of January 2022 07:59:47 PM

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Fuel Filler Cap assemby...

After reading the previous post, you may wonder why now I need 3-keys to get to all the bikes keyed functions...First off, the bike only came with the 1-key upon purchase, & it operated everything, but was attached to a rubber-crocodile thingy, & this acted as a sail, & pulled the key out somewhere out on the A55 hwy...So when I arrived at Walgott to fuel-up, I realized that I couldn't, as I'd lost the key lol.

A quick trip to the other-side-of-town saw me at a local mechanic, & after he finally showed-up, we drilled the fuel-caps key-barrel out with a 4-mm drill. Eventually, enough fragments build-up, & the barrel moves, releasing the retainers. I then went to the gas-station, filled-up, & secured the filler-cap-down with your regular black electrical insulation tape. (And this worked better than you may think, holding its own, tank-after-tank, week after-week, until the new filler-cap assy arrived from Suzuki, that cost me $180:00 once I was back home here in Tasmania).

At the end of that day, I checked-in to a great hotel at Forbes, & explained to the owner my circumstance with the key, & that I'll have to leave the bike running outside my room for a few minutes, since I needed to remove the LH inner side-cover, to access the fuses, & remove the main-fuse to shut-her-down. He said that he owned a few Suzuki's, & had a heap of keys, & said that I could try-them-out if I liked. So as I was placing my stuff inside the room with the bike still running outside, I heard him yell-out " Hey, this key fits" & he then shut my bike down before I could say "No"!!!...

Anyhow, the key may have fitted the barrel, & shut-the-bike-down, but was never going to turn the other-way, & switch the ignition back-on...So the next day, a call to the local lock-smith, who was over 100-km's away in the next town, came down, & made me a master-key, that worked everything after obtaining the build date / VIN / engine numbers. I also had a few spares made-up too, just-in-case lol !

So in finishing, I found it funny that a lock-smith can make me a key that works everything using the bike-data, & Suzuki can't send me a fuel-cap assy using their own information that uses the same key, go figure...And this is why now, I need a different key to operate each function LOL ! ( 1 x ignition, 1 x fuel cap, & 1 x seat / rear cowl ).

It was an awesome trip BTW, & kudos to the Hotel owner, who refused me even paying for half-of-the-cost of the lock-smith's services. I only paid for the extra back-up set-of keys ;) !



-- Edited by Rastus on Saturday 8th of January 2022 07:47:09 PM

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Wow! I just read them all! You took such detail in explaining everything it's a shame this nugget stays tucked away in the Cafe! Hopefully you have shared this wealth of knowledge with other bike forums as it's all good reading and I don't even own a bike!

20 sets of tires you say? WOW, you do a lot of riding!

Sounds like the front bearings may have just been cheap... I do lots of bearings and it's really a crap shoot... anymore they are ALL made in China (for cars in the aftermarket anyway)

You have done some serious bonding with the bike! I'd like to do some bonding with the Corvette but winter is here and we have poor morale ozzing across the country. It would be VERY hard to enjoy yourself in this current environment and the cost only increasing. So I have been doing home improvements instead. 

Three sets of keys will not be as nice as one that fits all... but given the cost I'd wait out a better option too!



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Thanks SELLC.

With the current Covid bollox, & having been let-go from work, the bike has become the "go to" machine, simply because of its manoueverability, & likely over-all cheaper running costs than a car. The 350SLC sits under a cover, awaiting better times, & turns 50 next year, & the wagon I had was crashed & written-off, via constant gov't / police / community intervention, that I can only blame for my Nuclear revelations, & possibly my interaction with the ET's. It seemed that every-time I spoke or posted about Australia's nuclear interests, I had the law up-my-ass every-time I set foot out-of-my apartment. But these mofo's seemed to back-right-off once they witnessed the ET / UFO interaction going-on most nights ;) !

Suspension issues...

The rear suspension has held-up really well, & to be quite honest, I've never touched it, or needed to adjust it. As with most bikes however, once the rear-tire wears down to a certain point, the ride can become a little irritable & harsh over bumps, but that's due to a lack-of-rubber, rather than component issues.

The front suspension is holding-up well too. However, the diamond-nitrite ( spell check ) coating was already showing signs of wear & tear, with the chrome-plating lining becoming visible once you lift the front-end-up, for wheel removal & tire changing. ( The diamond nitrite coating appears a gold color, & chrome is chrome ).

I've only had to replace the front fork-seals once so far, as over time, they wear out, & at first sweat, leaving a small smear of oil that collects dust that you simply wipe away, but then the day comes, when you eventually find a drop or two of oil on the concrete below the fork-leg. You can let this go until you organize yourself with parts, as the leak is minor, & each fork-leg holds around 465-mls of oil.

The OEM seals are a single-lip item, but at the time of investigation, I found out that SKF offered double-lip seals, or single lip seals at around half-the-price of OEM. This SKF pricing meant that I could by the No1 weight fork-oil for free, so I opted for the double-lipped seals, knowing that the diamond-nitrite coating was worn away, & that seal-leakage may be a problem in the future as the layers of plating on the fork-legs wear away. To my surprise, these seals are still holding-up well, don't leak, & were changed-out over 3-years ago. And suspension action wasn't altered too much by using double-lip seals.

No doubt the day will come when I have to replace the fork-legs, or just have them resurfaced with chrome-plating, but at this time of writing, that day is further away than I thought. Awesome ;) !

The price of the SKF seals was less than $20:00 each, & the oil was around the $50:00 mark.

Doing the job itself isn't too bad, or as complicated as the manuals diagrams may have you think. The trick is to use the bikes triple-clamps to crack-off the drain-plug, & filler-cap before you remove the forks from the bike ;) !






-- Edited by Rastus on Sunday 9th of January 2022 03:50:50 PM

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The Front Seat...

Strange to be writing about such a component, but regretfully the skin that's fitted to this item doesn't have the lasting qualities of previous bikes made by Suzuki, & mine started to split & crack soon after arriving back home. Not a big deal you think to yourself until you discover that Suzuki wants over $400:00 for a new seat, where the same thing will happen within a few years...And to have it re-skinned by a local trades-person in that business, will see you part with about half-that-amount...And the seat-skins available on the internet via e-bay etc etc are extraordinarily expensive too, especially when you add-in exchange-rate, postage, & the fact that you have to do the rear seat also, to keep the looks original. It seems that people from all corners are going to make good money on reskinning / replacing your seat cover.

I haven't bothered with this item as yet, as a $02:00 roll of gaffer-tape (lol) is holding-up quite well, & surprisingly doesn't look too bad until you get-up-close. Of course, my ass is sitting on the seat most times, so I've moved this into the "do later" basket, though it does annoy you to have a generally good-looking-bike with a dodgy seat cover lol !

I've also tried locally sourcing sheep-skin, but the door to the sheep-skin-complex never seems to be open.

There's plenty of pneumatic tools available on e-bay, that will re-staple a cover back-on for less than $40:00, but I'm also pretty sure that a heat-gun will also be required, as the original cover is both glued & stapled in place, so heating the glue is needed in removing the skin, so as to not damage the foam.

For the record, the RF900R's seat ( 25-years old ) & the GSXR1100's ( 30-years old ) have never required re-skinning.



-- Edited by Rastus on Monday 10th of January 2022 08:06:15 PM

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The Voltage Regulator...

I've already written plenty about this item in another thread, I think called "Lithium Iron Batteries". The bottom line is that your VR should be holding a steady discharge voltage, back into the battery, regardless of RPM being throttled / varied, of at least 13.5 volts, & up to a maximum of 14.8 volts. It's easy enough to check this out-put with a multi-meter set on the 20-volt DC scale, & it's probably worth checking every service that you remove the front seat for, when you vacuum-out the air-filter element. Any discrepancy means replacement, or you'll be having irregular charging issue with your battery. In fact, if you find that you're going through the batteries regularly, chances are the VR is playing-up, just not when you're testing it. I rode around for about a week with the multi-meter strapped to the fuel-tank with only good results measured, or at least within specification...So I took a chance & bought a new, branded, $45:00 unit on e-bay, & my battery woes have disappeared ;) !

Suzuki want you to fork-out $457:00 for the OEM VR...


Batteries...

Possibly the Achilles-heel of the Hayabusa is the battery...Once the OEM dies, there's a massive amount of batteries to choose from, & all claim extra CCA's, & branded as Heavy-Duty, better than OEM...The majority of these claims is bollox, especially if you choose a lead-acid type, & live in a cold climate...In fact, the gel-type batteries that claim the same are not up-to-it in the cold weather, once the temperature outside drops below 15-10-deg-C...

The real issue is that the battery compartment under the seat is too-small, & does not allow a battery of any big CCA's to live in there, such as say a battery for a Harley-Davidson. And after a search on the internet, it seems that many people simply make-up another battery-cradle above the gear-box, that then allows 2 x regular 175 CCA batteries to be fitted-up in series, instead of the one 175 CCA battery, that Suzuki specify.

I can now confirm that after the 1-year mark of ownership, that the Lithium Iron Battery I fitted-up is holding-up quite well, & has not been removed since the fitting of the new VR for recharging. Yes, during winter, it's a pain-in-the-ass & temperamental, with a warm-through needed, & more than likely a second crank to fire the bike-up, but in summer, it starts 1st-time, every-time, without the warm-through. So it has merit lol during the summer months...

STD replacement batteries from the bike shops are around the $400:00 + to purchase, & they're mostly lead-acid Yuasa's at the specified 175 CCA's.

Aftermarket lead-acid & gel batteries can be bought from $50:00 up to say $150:00 that are recommended replacements at or above the min-needed 175 CCA's, but they won't last out a year, & hence a warranty claim will be made, & not to mention recharging regularly in the colder weather. Plus, the problem will re-occur, so the only solution without going the double-battery route, is to grab a Lithium Iron high out-put type.

The Lithium Iron battery I fitted up cost me $240:00, & claimed a 3,000+ deep cycle life-span, & a whopping 280 CCA...It's a feather-weight, & weighs less than 1-kg, & hopefully lasts a few more years. I did surprisingly get a refund of about $75:00 from the lead-acid-battery supplier, who over 3-years coughed up 4-batterries, with 3-being warranty claims, so that brings the price down on the Lithium down to about $170:00, if you want to look at it this way lol !

By comparison with the RF900R, I was on my 3rd battery in the 20-years of ownership. The GSXR1100 batteries have held-up quite well too, with lack-of-use being their demise, & I've only replaced the one battery with this bike.



-- Edited by Rastus on Tuesday 11th of January 2022 06:01:51 PM

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The Air Filter Element...

People do all sorts of things to find extra horse-power, & in most cases, an aftermarket air-filter ( assy ) may-well-find you a few more...But this Suzuki by design, has been made with twin-ram-air, cold-air-induction ducts, that then direct collected air from the nose of the front fairing, & into a central air-box, that all the engines cylinders feed from via stacked, & 2 x pairs of different length intake-runners. The differing lengths of these runners is mainly to ensure a better evenly contaminated air-filter than widening any performance characteristic of a pair-of-cylinders, within a certain rev-range, though this may well have some effect in this manner.

The air-filter itself is triangular in shape, & differs from many std designs in that the "partially pressurized air" once it gets to the filter, moves from the center-inside of the filter, to the out-side, & into the sealed air-box cavity, where the 4 x intake runners feed from the rear of this air-box. Of course the advertising & blog for the ram-air suggests mild super-charging effects by its use, but in reality, you'll never ever reach a positive air-pressure reaching any cylinder, but likely a partial loss of absolute negative pressure is affected, with a new & clean filter, & when high speeds start to enter into the equation. This effect and the colder away-from-the-motor air being fed into the engine does make a difference for sure, but it's not super-charging.

All this said, & the way that the air moves from the center to the outer of the filter means that the std OEM multi-cotton-layer filter is best, hands-down, in this environment. The trick to cleaning it out is to use a vacuum-cleaner from its center to pull-the-dust & crap out. I do this every service, or 4,000-K. And the filter in it now has likely seen close to 100,000-ks use, & is still good-to-use. The tell-tale is looking for dark shadows of contamination on the outer clean sides, which is easy to see when held to a light. The surfaces are as white as when the filter was new, meaning that dirt & dust has not as yet found its way to the outer edge, or into the engine.

The std filter from Suzuki is a cool $60:00 to buy, but lasts well, & does a great job imo. Breathing through the filter yourself via your mouth reveals minimal restriction to air-flow, & yet the crap caught in the center sees good filtration results.

Aftermarket filters like K & N are available, but will cost a whopping $190:00 here in Oz...And throw in the $50:00 asked for the cleaning solutions, means its an expensive item to get yourself, though no-doubt there is an improvement in the breathing of the engine. In fact, its because the air flows on a Hayabusa through its air-filter in the reverse way of a car, that puts me off a K & N type filter, that you have to wash-out, & re-oil, simply because to clean it / wash it, you're always going to be throwing the dirt into an opposite side of the triangular filter, meaning lots of time & hassle to properly clean-it. Not to mention the hassle of time to dry-it-out, & the time needed to re-oil properly.

It's a shame that there's no real way to measure the power-gains of the air-induction-system of this bike, but imo, the std air-filter keeps the crap-out well-enough to warrant its reuse over a K & N type. And *uck you K & N for your greedy pricing here in this instance. And amazingly, hats-off to Suzuki for their awesome OEM item that works well, & isn't a rip-off.






-- Edited by Rastus on Tuesday 11th of January 2022 06:45:44 PM

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The Fairings & Plastics...

Should you ever have an accident where your panel-work / plastics are damaged, there's multiple choices here to choose from to get you going again, with perhaps "time" being the key to what path you'll take...

* OEM plastics are a perfect fit, & generally color-matched to perfection. But they're also extraordinarily expensive, & may prove that you'll have to look elsewhere, especially since if enough of the bike is damaged ( & it doesn't take much ), your insurance - company, may deem your near perfectly good & repairable bike, a write-off, due to this expense...Expect on average to have to find around $650:00 or more per panel, & there's 4-major ones...Sheez, Suzuki want you to fork out $400:00 for the rear-seat cowl...And the inner black-plastics are also around the $100:00 mark each, of which there's at least 6...

* Repairing the plastics is always possible, especially if you have all the bits & pieces. There's plenty of people that can do this work if you search-them-out, & they're also used to painting & restoration, & will prove favorable against OEM costs, & possibly allow you to avoid an insurance claim, & keep your rating, whilst bringing the bike back-up-to-scratch. This possibility of course, depends on the accident itself, & whether anyone else was involved. Then you have no choice but to follow that rivers course, but it may be possible to repurchase the bike from the insurance company after the claims have been settled. But you must let them know your intentions, as they're generally auctioned-off before you see any cash from them.

* Aftermarket fairings that are available from Hong Kong are awesome, & cheap too...Sometimes you'll be lucky & find a set that's near-on OEM design & color, though there's far more other color options & paint schemes available when searching, & these may well be what you want, if customizing your bike was at some-point on-the-cards. The cost for a full-set-of-painted fairings, including a solo-seat-cowl, & all the inner plastics, with a bolt-kit thrown-in for good measure, was all of $650:00 delivered. Costs to people in the US-of-A is far cheaper too btw, & it's likely that many folks buy these fairing kits to customize their bikes, & store away the expensive OEM stuff, without necessarily an accident being the cause of this decision. The outside plastics are a near-perfect fit, with only the inner black plastics leaving small gaps here & there. Mixing OEM & aftermarket plastics is possible, & will get rid of any gaps etc etc.

The only issue here however with these plastics, is that if you acquire a minor mark or scratch, there's no paint-codes to guide you to a color-matched repair, so you'll be guided by a paint-stores experience, but the repair will always be evident to a trained-eye who can see the miss-match of colors. Computers can match paint also if a sample is provided, but its still a hit-&-miss affair, though you may get lucky. The simplest fix in these instances is to paint the whole-sections / side, but costs will escalate.

Levers & mirrors.

These can be found for peanuts in the aftermarket when compared to OEM replacement costs. As an example, aftermarket mirrors were obtained for my bike at around $22:00 each, & the OEM mirrors were $140:00 each...You'll find the same results with the brake & clutch levers, so search them out !



-- Edited by Rastus on Wednesday 12th of January 2022 09:07:03 PM

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Exhaust system...

Though the Hayabusa performs quite well with the std system fitted, & even has a subtle deep-burble to it that's quite likeable, there is quite a remarkable change in performance to be gained by the fitting of an aftermarket system, particularly with the 4-2-1 designs out there.

The main issue with the std system is the heat generated, that keeps engine temperatures hovering on the gauge, very near to where the electric cooling is switched-on, meaning that even on a cold-day through winter, you will hear the fan come-on, even after only a couple-of-sets of red-lights when you're in city traffic. Another effect of the std system ( & this happens on most multi-cylinder big-bore bikes with a std system fitted ), is that when the torque & power graphs are studied, you'll always discover a flattening-out, & even a dip in the torque-curve from around the 4,000-RPM mark, & up to the 5,000-RPM mark. This dip / flattening-out of the torque curve is essentially caused by the std exhaust system, where-by at that 4,000-RPM range, the exhaust-system reaches a saturation-point of where it's completely full, & can't empty itself quicker than it's being filled, & so by the 5,000-RPM mark, the pistons within the engine have then over-come this dip, by sacrificing energy ( power ) to push the residual gasses out, & the curve then climbs upwards again, at a reduced possible gain.

By contrast, the typical 4-2-1 system has no restrictions, & so the engine breathes as it should, & is not robbed of any torque or power. In fact, dyno graphs indicate no dips or flattening-out of the torque curve at all, revealing only a steady climb in outputs, due to the enhanced, & very real scavenging effect produced, creating even more enhanced volumetric efficiency. This gain in torque & power is stunningly revealed by producing at least a 22-HP gain through the engines mid-range power, & netting a minimum of at least 7-HP peak power over std at Maximum RPM, & all without re-tuning, or re-flashing the std computer...Re-flashing the computer can see even more power gained at high RPM's, but this can be expensive to do, is needed again & again after battery disconnexions during general maintenance, since the memory is wiped, & std settings return. I've heard of some racing folks paying around $400:00 per-year for a program that needs refreshing every 12-months to operate. There's also a unit known as a Power Commander that couples in-between the wiring harness & computer so that personal settings & tune can be achieved, but this is also expensive, & IMO certainly not needed on the street, & for racing applications only, or where heavily modded engines are produced, such as turbo-charged units.

The other cheaper & often used method of exhaust enhancement is where the std headers are retained, but are coupled to a pair of free-flowing mufflers. Similar gains in torque & power are to be gained by this method, but dyno-charts indicate less gain in the mid-range, & only at best 2-HP gain at the top-end, when compared to the4-2-1 free-flowing race-systems available.

There are a massive amount of brands to choose from, & to my surprise, I managed to get a full Yoshimura 4-2-1 race system for a little over 1-K a few years ago, that you can read about on Page-1 of this thread. This system is the design that all the other manufacturers purchase, & make their own copies of...

The cheaper twin-muffler option will set you back to close to 1-K, with muffler prices being around the $450:00 each.

Std OEM muffler replacement cost is around $850:00 EACH...

Generally speaking, most people will buy either of the two power-enhancing exhaust types, & then sell the bike with the std OEM system refitted, that then enables them to sell the after-market types separately afterwards, recouping at least half of the initial outlay.

The 4-2-1 full stainless steel race system fitted to my bike ( and it truly is a work-of-art ) also comes with an insert kit that drops the db's (& power) for those concerned with making too-much-noise, but leaves the rumble & note available, by reducing the out-let to around 20-mm, from 40mm.



-- Edited by Rastus on Thursday 13th of January 2022 05:37:20 PM

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Wow! This is quite a little journal you have going here! 

You run the wheels off that bike! Literally twenty + times now!



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SELLC wrote:

Wow! This is quite a little journal you have going here! 

You run the wheels off that bike! Literally twenty + times now!


 LOL !

Thanks SELLC, but the bike by default ( since Covid etc etc ) has been my only transport for a few years now. The 350SLC is going once again, but needs registration, & this registration will be of the "club", limited use type, which is heaps cheaper than regular rego, at around $250:00 per-year. The car also needs a master-cylinder-kit, as I've lost rear brakes via fluid leak at the rear-seal, plus a RWC ( road worthy cert. )...I'll also likely need to get the odometer fixed, as the tumblers only intermittently work, keeping the mileage down lol. With this club-type registration, you have to keep a log-book to keep it registered legally, & apparently the book is checked at each renewal, but I need to check this out more.

This part of the thread however is coming to a close soon, as it's nearly done ( thank God lol )...I was only going to post a little-more about Yoshimura Camshafts, & another little plug-in device known as a TRE, followed by my own summary, good & bad about owning & running the beast...There's a lot of blog already out-on-the-net re-this bike, like the Hayabusa Owners Group that has some good information, but it mostly ends-up inconclusive...eg. Folks quite often start a thread about an issue they have, that's similar to your own, & you read-it-through for a few pages only to read that the bike is now fixed, but without revealing what the fix was LOL !!! So it ends up being a read where you learn / pick-up bits & pieces, but there's no meat & potatoes, only a taste of the gravy, leaving you high & dry, & at worst, even confused at times...There really are some poor posters out there... It's like they want to keep their "secret fix" all to themselves, & only want to reveal that they had an issue & resolved it, without revealing what they did, or what they found, so they appear to be smart or something lol...But that's OK too, "our job" / way of making a living is by fixing stuff & doing the hard yards to get results, so it's no problem for me at all, except for the feeling of being missled-for-a-bit, & having my time wasted...But not in this thread LOL !



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Camshafts...

This engine has dual camshafts operating 4-valves-per-cylinder, (one intake, & one exhaust cam), that directly activate the valves via a shim & bucket assy. The std OEM cams are fine to be quite honest, & when compared to your average car out there, are comparably already lower-end race-cams, as the 1150+ idle RPM suggests, with maximum power delivered at around the 10,000-RPM mark, with a further 1,000-RPM safe RPM band to be entered from the quick acceleration rates in the lower gears. This sees a red-line staring at 11,000-RPM. So the over-all package is really good, with strong low-RPM power produced in any gear, followed by a blistering mid-range, that then leads into feel-to-believe, super-long & arm-out-of-socket-wrenching top-end power LOL !

I've watched the "Ghostrider" videos a few times over the years, & always find it amazing that these crazy dudes ride their turboed 1,000cc machines flat-out at 300-kmph with the tacho hitting the limiters at 11,000 odd RPM all the way to the next town 50-odd kms away, & then jump on a Hayabusa in the next clip, & their gear-shift-points are around only the 8,000 rpm mark...Such is the acceleration & pull of the Hayabusa, no more needs to be said...

One really needs to ride one-of-these babies to appreciate the performance available...


*ST1 Camshafts...In a world where nothing exceeds like excess, Yoshimura offers a couple of camshaft options, & the ST1 package comes with a pair of new billet cams, & it's recommended that a new set of Yoshimura hi-po valve retainers are also fitted. The dyno graphs offered from the website suggest that the ST1's closely follow the std camshafts power & torque delivery all the way through, but offer even more top-end-power increases. No doubt peak-out-put will vary depending on computer flashing & other electrical mods, but the graph indicates at least a further 10-hp gain at the top-end, & likely drives the rev-ceiling for max-hp to the 11,000-RPM mark. From what I can tell from the specs given, over-all valve lift is increased by about 0.5mm only. No doubt these work well as the Yoshimura reputation suggests, & are likely the ones to fit up for the person that wants a little more oomph than a std machine.

*ST2 Camshafts...These are the full-on racing cams, & I've seen videos of a Hayabusa on a European race track easily cresting the 13,000-rpm mark in every gear...No doubt these will see you get the 200+-hp numbers at those rpm's, but the supplied dyno graph suggests substantial torque & power-losses at rpm below the 5,000-rpm mark, & only sees power gains that surpass the std & ST1 cams above the 7,000-rpm mark. So these babies imo should be avoided unless your bike is a race-track bike only, since in the real-world, where laws & speed limits apply, you'll spend all this money to actually lose a lot of power in road use, since at 5,000-rpm in top-gear, the Hayabusa is cruising around the 160-km / 100-mph mark, & its this rpm where these cams start to flow & make good power again.

These cams are not off-the-shelf & generally ready for purchase. They'll set you back around $1,000, & once you pay your money, Yoshimura will make you your new cams, & then mail-them out to you.

No doubt theres' other brands out there that claim this & that, but Yoshimura have been at the top-of-this racing-game at international level for decades, & all the combined wins over this time guarantees a good product with no worries.



-- Edited by Rastus on Saturday 15th of January 2022 04:18:06 AM

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TRE...

This device, plugs into the wiring harness & joins into the gearbox's wiring loom. It's full name is the Timing Retard Eliminator, & provides the so-called "perfect" ignition & fueling map that's been allocated to 5-th gear only, to every other gear... 6-th gear has the top-speed limiter set at 186-mph, & without any wire snipping, using the TRE allows the full potential of the engine to be accessed, as well as out-right top-speed performance, since the computer is tricked into processing 5-th gear specs only. In std trim, every-other-gear has a different map set-up, essentially to keep the bike performance at its peak, but with modified timing & fueling characteristics, so that the front wheel essentially stays planted on the road as often as possible.

IMO, its use is not really warranted on this bike, since the motor spins-up through the revs quite fast in any gear already (lol), & pulling wheelies is easy enough already for those that do these things. The subtle timing & fueling alterations are apparently only effective up to the 5,000-rpm mark in any case, & wide-open-throttle sees these maps dial themselves into optimum ignition & fueling anyhow, even at rpm's below 5,000. So its use will no-doubt improve throttle-response & power in these rpm-ranges, but imo the Hayabusa already zips through these rev-ranges quickly & effectively already...And the truth is that most bikes 600cc's & over accelerate nearly the same up-to say 100-kmph, since you can only accelerate so fast on "any" bike with the front wheel on the ground, & all are blessed with good HP & super light weight, so the bikes rev-up quicker than you can dial in full throttle anyway. And on the Hayabusa, it really doesn't stamp its authority until say 4-th gear is reached, where everyone will be behind you guaranteed.

Some folks will love the TRE & what it does, if only because immobilizes the top-speed limiter, & on the Hayabusa, that's probably all it's worth. This said, on lower capacity machines, it's use would be very beneficial on lower powered / capacity machines, that tend to need to be revved-hard through each gear, or where incorrect gear selection has happened & you're at WOT.

You can get these for around $ 65:00 on e-bay delivered. And most have been improved to ensure that the neutral-indicator-light still works on the dash, that early versions couldn't do.



-- Edited by Rastus on Sunday 16th of January 2022 01:32:18 AM

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Dealer Mode...

Suzuki are kind to their customers, & offer an electrical plug, usually accessed near the chassis around the rear-seat area, that when bridged, & with the ignition ON, will reveal any faults via the little LCD clock display, that displays these faults as codes, that you then cross-reference with the manual to identify. Typically a warning light will 1st appear on the dashboard, indicating a fault, & away you go.

Dealer mode also allows you to dial-in correct Throttle Position, via the clock also, with 3 x little LCD dots that sit from top-to-bottom, since the bike has a Throttle Position Sensor. You will more than likely need to adjust this after a "Throttle Synchronization" has been carried out, using the good-'ol Carby-Balancing-Gauge set. Your settings are correct when the middle dot is indicated.

Your throttles are reasonably consistent & reliable, & I only check & adjust them once a year. The typical tell-tale that your bike needs this adjustment I've found is when the "hunting" sound is not apparent on your cold start & warm-up. As long as I hear the normal warm-through exhaust sounds, everything is still within spec. This said, after re-synchronizing the throttles, easier starts & even more power is produced, since each cylinder is receiving the same air-quantity.

A Balancing Gauge set can be bought for around the $150:00 mark, & is a tool well worth owning imo.









-- Edited by Rastus on Sunday 16th of January 2022 09:52:13 PM

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Ownership Pro's & Con's...

Yes, I bought this bike 2nd-hand, with about 39,000-k's on its odometer, & after my my loved RF900R suffered a fatal accident, whereby a lack-of-parts & combined expenses ensured no resurrection was possible...This even included the fact that no RF900R's were available for sale Australia-wide after searching...

Anyhow, I took my chances & flew-up to Townsville in QLD, where I bought the Hayabusa, & had the pleasure of riding it back down south through 3 x States, & a little over 3,000-km's traversed, over a 3-day & 1-night period. It was a great riding experience, & a testament to the Hayabusa for getting me home safely, & without any mechanical issues what-so-ever, & in surprising comfort, with around 1,000-km traveled each day. No aches & pains what-so-ever, & that was with a back-pack filled with clothes, shoes, chain-lube & water strapped on the whole distance. Without doubt, imo, long distance travel in comfort is likely its best attribute, all other accolades that you may read about elsewhere considered.

Pro's...

* Excellent power & delivery, making it a stupid-easy bike for anyone to be able to ride.
* Great reliabilty imo, as this thread indicates.
* Superb handling in the twisties, which is something most people wouldn't expect.
* Excellent fuel mileage at hwy cruise speeds & above, whereby 19:00-km per liter of fuel can be experienced.
* Regular / normal riding sees excellent tire wear characteristics & surprising longevity. ( This can quickly change to really poor depending on rider habits lol ).
* Reasonable access to service points, though the RF900R was better, & the 1100 is possibly the more challenging & time consuming of these bikes at service time.
* Longevity ( so far ) without too many parts being needed, only the regular perishables / service items needed by all bikes & cars alike.
* Huge aftermarket supply of quality bits & pieces available at a fraction of OEM prices.


Con's...

* OEM cost of spare parts when needed.
* Finding a good reliable battery that fits in the given cradle with lasting qualities over a year lol.
* Seat covers will need replacing guaranteed at some point.



-- Edited by Rastus on Sunday 16th of January 2022 10:20:55 PM

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How fast does "yours" go ?

I've been asked this question by a couple of people over the years, though it doesn't come-up as often as you may think, & to be honest, I just ride it like an everyday bike, & hardly ever explore the upper regions of its performance...But when I have...

1st gear will see you break all local max. speed limits, allowing around 110-120-kmph, or say 65-70-mph somewhere around the 10-11,000-rpm.

2nd gear will see 160-170-kmph, or 100-105 mph approximately.

3rd gear will see 210-220-kmph or 125-130 mph.

4th gear will see 250-260-kmph or 145-150 mph.

*5th gear will see the 280-290-kmph or 175-180 mph at a guess...

*6th gear when de-restricted has been claimed to reach 322-kmph with the mirrors removed on Police radar, on a UK air-strip by the Fast Bikes magazine.

I've asterixed 5th & 6th gear since these are likely claimed results. And from 1st through 4th gear I have explored, & is the best that I can remember with split-second glancing at the instruments. You have to remember that everything goes-by so fast, & it's more important to have your eyes on-the-road, than on your instrumentation at these speeds, so these are good approximations at best. Tasmania hasn't got any roads good enough or straight enough to explore these upper regions. And the roads that may offer this exploration, are typically heavily Policed. I'm also getting old, & when I do sometimes "go fast", I find that 240-kmph is about my limit, where I still have my wits about me. And more often than not, WOT up to 200-kmph only prolongs the experience, & is easier on everything, myself included lol !

I can confirm however, that I've reached 280-kmph as indicated on the speedo on this bike. Usually I'm in top-gear at legal speeds, & decide to open-her-wide-open without dropping-down any gears, as there's no need to, since the acceleration is pretty sweet, even in top-gear, when the moment is right, & on the right road. I usually do this when a tire-change is drawing near, & the tires cornering abilities have depreciated, so then its straight-lining & valve-cleaning time lol !

The registration-plate on my machine interestingly had the stamping of "191-MPH" when I bought it..So there's a possibility of it being officially raced & recorded, as it would be too-much of a coincidence imo to have a random rego-plate come off the production line that resembles the top-speed of these machines.

The first bikes released back in 1999 were unrestricted & did "whatever" they did, with 312-kmph being the most average recorded top speed through most magazine results found around the world.

A year later Kawasaki released their ZX-12, & whilst it didn't handle as well as the Hayabusa, would walk away from it when the Hayabusa was flat-out revving on its limiter...

By September 2000, all bikes were speed limited to 186-mph, or if you rather 300-kmph max.



-- Edited by Rastus on Tuesday 18th of January 2022 07:06:28 PM

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Wow Rastus! This is a master peice!

If you ever want to display it publicly let me know, we can edit it to take out all the edits, remove all my "wow comments" (if you want to keep it compact and powerful) and perhaps even branch out from there. We can even lock it down so nobody can comment on it, or prune it however you see fit...

Seems like such a waste of good information sitting in here where only we have access and none of us have that bike... I bet a lot of guys would really enjoy the insight and dedication you have put into documenting your ownership of this beast!

I'm impressed! 



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Yo,

Thanks SELLC, I didn't think these posts would make such an impression, but I do keep a log-book per-se on all the maintenance-stuff, since you can then loosely predict when the next fork-out from your wallet is needed, & what to expect. And since this is a generally hi-po mechanics / engineer oriented forum, I figured y'all might enjoy the read lol !

Probably by multiplying by 0.7 will give an approximate price in USD for all the dollars & cents posted in AUD, & what someone might expect to pay over time for ownership of one of these babies. And this includes all motorcycles too, where chain & sprocket life are about the same, among other parts listed.

Since you approve & recommend its posting "in public", I say go-for-it. I only kept it in the V-8 cafe since the Cafe is more to do with personal stuff, & this whole web-site is essentially about cars, not bikes. It made sense to post stuff in here, at least up until now.

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It is for sure a wealth of information, and quite interesting as well... I never got much into repairing my can-a-tuna 600 but I was probably only 19 at the time when I bought it.

Should we polish the thread? Take out current edits and such?

I am thinking the General Auto Forum or the MBTB... I think both would draw up under key words the same on search engines, just depends where you think best placement would be.

Also, you want it locked, or do you wanna have comments?

I think if it helps just a single person, it's worth it. Just a wealth of information here! You have done well, had no idea you were turning these kinds of km/mi

 



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Hi SELLC,

Computers & websites are your domain for sure, so I'll leave it to you, as to what's best.

Editing is probably a good thing too. I'd suggest starting the new thread from my recent posts, celebrating the 100,000-mile milestone reached, simply because there's likely a million Hayabusa threads already in existence, but very few with 100,000-miles introducing the topic lol !

Possibly the only editing-out that I'd do myself is the fact that I named a Kawasaki-shop as dodgy people. Should anyone down here come across it, it may cause some local trouble, since quite a few folks down here are actually crooks, & I've named one of the many. I'll go back & tidy that up if you like, if it's possible to do so, & if you think it a good idea.

Maybe just a simple motorcycle section is what we need in here ? I have some great books, & could "historically" post up some stuff about the big Japanese 4 companies, & their triumphs & losses over the years. And then people ( like Shawnee ) can post about their own bikes etc etc.

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Sorry Rastus, I totally got side-tracked today... blindsided really...

I agree with you, we should open up a "small engine" forum for motocycles, dirt bikes, 4 wheelers, lawn mowers and the likes... probably place it right under the "General Repair" section.

Once I get back on top of this mess over here I'll get it done and we will have a place for everyone to post their non-vehicle information. Good thinking!



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You should be all good to edit this thread to perfection, removing all "edited by" titles, my ohhh'n and ahhh'n and anything else you like. 

You can also remove this post too... I didn't want to fiddle with the thread so I figured this would be the best way for you to make it a "flawless" presentation of your remarkable journey!



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Thanks admin ;) !

For those of you wondering what this is all about, & who like to read from the last post first, the short version is that this thread about my GSXR-1300 was originally in the private V-8 Cafe section of this forum, simply because this forum is about cars, & my bike is a personal-treat that I wrote about, & there was no where else to put it, plus I figured no one would give a rats-ass anyhow lol.

It's appearance, now in public, is due to a new area in the forum being made for small engines, & the fact that recently, I've been posting-up the pro's & con's of ownership of one of these babies, as I'm celebrating clocking over 100,000-miles / 160,000-km's...

The admin thought it worth going public with because of its content, so here it is & enjoy !

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I thought the thread was really cool and packed with good information!

Calling a 1300cc bike a "small engine" is somewhat laughable, considering these bikes are fast as hell, but I did find a few other threads that go well with the theme... perhaps "small engine" is not the best name for the forum? I'm always open for ideas!

One more thing, I never knew the GSXR was the "Hayabusa"! They are one in the same and not different bikes?



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SELLC wrote:

I thought the thread was really cool and packed with good information!

Calling a 1300cc bike a "small engine" is somewhat laughable, considering these bikes are fast as hell, but I did find a few other threads that go well with the theme...

1. Perhaps "small engine" is not the best name for the forum? I'm always open for ideas!

2. One more thing, I never knew the GSXR was the "Hayabusa"! They are one in the same and not different bikes?


 Yo,

R1.  The name is OK with me, even if the engine is a cool 500cc's larger than some small cars have out there lol ! In the motorcycle world, it is a large engine, but when compared with cars, or even mining / marine engines, it's small...

R2. The GSXR-1300 & Hayabusa are the one & the same thing...The name Hayabusa came about because in the late 1990's, Honda with their CBR-1100 "Blackbird" was the fastest std OEM bike you could get. Suzuki knowing that their GSXR-1300 was about to blow the Blackbird to the weeds, called the GSXR-1300 a "Hayabusa", where in nature, the Hayabusa is a peragrin falcon, that can swoop down to speeds over 300-kmph, & black-birds are its natural prey.



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Cool, because I thought lawn and tractor would be even more offensive.

That is a cool story too, how they one upped the competition with a bird higher up on the food chain! lol



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SELLC wrote:

Cool, because I thought lawn and tractor would be even more offensive.

That is a cool story too, how they one upped the competition with a bird higher up on the food chain! lol


 

LOL !!!

The Hayabusa may have a motor of 80-cubes, but that's about all you can compare it to with regards to a Harley Davidson or similar, as then "Lawn & Tractor" would have been perfect ...

That said, there are some nice looking Harley's etc out there, & each to their own. If you're happy, I'm happy too. It's not about what you ride, its about enjoying the ride & simply being out there doing it.



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Mathematics...

I was also thinking that a little-bit of simple maths would also get the GSXR-1300 away from the "lawn & tractor" scenario, & into the hi-po reality that it has ruled for over 20-years now...

I can confirm that a generation-1 Hayabusa weighs-in at approximately 250-kg's, when fully oiled-up & filled with fuel.

I can also confirm that a generation-1 Hayabusa makes 165-hp at the rear wheel, as confirmed by hundreds of dyno-tests available on You-Tube...


So let's bring these numbers into the world of cars, by simply multiplying the numbers above by 4, as this will bring the 250-kg figure up to 1,000-kg, or 1 x metric tonne.

This means that the horse-power provided is equivalent to 660-hp per tonne...

Should your car weigh-in at around the 2,000-kg range, & quite a few do when fully fueled-up & with a passenger, you would then have to make 1,320-hp to equal the performance of the GSXR-1300...

Your average 560SEL would weigh-in at about the 2,000-kg mark, & the factory gives you around 240-hp.

Don't you just love mathematics lol ;) ???!!!



-- Edited by Rastus on Wednesday 26th of January 2022 06:55:27 AM

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You see, I knew you were going to take it personally... I just didn't know what else to call it.

Farm and Tractor was just a joke, Small Engine seemed reaosnable since these are relatively "small engines" when you put them next to V8 and up muscle...

A Mecedes 560SEL also holds five people and a full trunk of cargo, not even in the same class as a motorcycle...

Is there a cooler name? Powersports or something? I dunno... 1300cc is still a small engine in muscle car V8 world... but just because something is small does not mean it's not fast or powerful. 

Few cars are going to keep up with a sports bike due to these weight proportions, and I have seen some motorcylcles with V8 Chevy 350's attached to them! 

I was more or less just trying a name where all non-auto related content would fit. 



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SELLC wrote:

1.You see, I knew you were going to take it personally... I just didn't know what else to call it.

2.Farm and Tractor was just a joke, Small Engine seemed reaosnable since these are relatively "small engines" when you put them next to V8 and up muscle...

3.A Mercedes 560SEL also holds five people and a full trunk of cargo, not even in the same class as a motorcycle...

4.Is there a cooler name? Powersports or something? I dunno... 1300cc is still a small engine in muscle car V8 world... but just because something is small does not mean it's not fast or powerful. 

5.Few cars are going to keep up with a sports bike due to these weight proportions, and I have seen some motorcylcles with V8 Chevy 350's attached to them! 

6.I was more or less just trying a name where all non-auto related content would fit. 


 

R1. No, not-at-all...But I did see an opportunity for using some maths to get the "Power-to-weight ratio" into perspective, so some credo was generated lol !

R2. V-8's are the best all-round engine choice for heavy cars imo. A power-pulse being generated every 90-degrees of crank-rotation makes for smooth & powerful operation at any rpm's. Motorcycles need 4-cyl's at least for that all-round smoothness & top-end rush. V-twins are popular too, but haven't got the top-end..Massive difference.

R3. Once again, once you convert the power-to-weight-ratio, you begin to understand how bikes can perform. Sure they're generally small engines, but they can freely rev-out to around double that of any car-engine...Maybe by saying that because of the 11,000rpm rev-ceiling of a GSXR-1300, is the equivalent of a 2.6-ltr 6-cylinder at 5,500-rpm, in terms of air-flow-potential would be a better comparison ?...

R4. Don't stress lol. ! Small engines is what they are...And folks that follow say Formula-1 racing all know that you can make more power out of small cc's than larger capacities...You just need more cylinders.

R5. Most Japanese 4-cylinder-motorcycles in std OEM trim, from 600-cc's and above will deliver  between 10 to 11-second 1/4-mile-times...The Hayabusa is in the 9-second-range. This all depends on the rider of course. No doubt cars can get into these figures too, but at great expense, & loss of reliability...

There's been people down this way that have used our Aussie V-8 ( 253 or 308 ) & made a motorcycle with these engines fitted. A 350 would be outrageous...

There's also a bike known as the Drysdale V-8, that was engineered & manufactured by Mr.Drysdale using 2 x Yamaha FZR-400 engines, where he simply added another 4-cylinders to an existing FZR-750 motor, & got it to work. I remember seeing & hearing it go around Philip Island Raceway in the late 1990's...There was your typical speculation & rumor of production possibilities, but they fizzled-out over time. It was quite an achievement however, & it sounded pretty good too.

R6. Don't stress lol. Small capacity engines are just that, small capacity. Their performance however speaks for itself ;) !

 

https://www.odd-bike.com/2013/01/drysdale-v8-homebrew-aussie-eight.html



-- Edited by Rastus on Friday 28th of January 2022 06:56:43 PM

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I owned a Katana 600 for awhile when I was younger... I know these bikes haul ass and mine was what you would call a "small" bike compared to the bigger 900-1300cc cafe race bikes.

That was the one thing I liked about the Katana 600, it was fast but not out of control fast... I always looked at the bigger bikes as serious trouble because they were so fast and out of control, which is to say you can't just open up a 1300cc bike out of the hole without the wheel coming up and over... on the 600 it was very hard to pop a wheelie unless I had a girl on the back, or going up some kind of incline. 

There is also a thread in here about a Yamaha SHO cruiser Jet-Ski... that thing had a 1.8 or 2.0 liter supercharged Chevy Colbalt engine in it! 

Small engines are a lot of fun!



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SELLC wrote:

1.I owned a Katana 600 for awhile when I was younger... I know these bikes haul ass and mine was what you would call a "small" bike compared to the bigger 900-1300cc cafe race bikes.

2.That was the one thing I liked about the Katana 600, it was fast but not out of control fast... I always looked at the bigger bikes as serious trouble because they were so fast and out of control, which is to say you can't just open up a 1300cc bike out of the hole without the wheel coming up and over... on the 600 it was very hard to pop a wheelie unless I had a girl on the back, or going up some kind of incline. 

3.There is also a thread in here about a Yamaha SHO cruiser Jet-Ski... that thing had a 1.8 or 2.0 liter supercharged Chevy Colbalt engine in it! 

4.Small engines are a lot of fun!


 

 R1. By the mid-1990's, the Japanese companies had the 600cc capacity revving really-hard, & making a solid 100-hp or there-abouts. I remember a good friend of mine letting me ride his Kawasaki ZZR-600, & I couldn't believe the performance. Solid & usable low to mid-range power, with an unbelievable rush up the top-end. I was so blown away, I asked if I could go around-the-block a 2nd-time lol ! I knew then that I only needed a 600cc-4-cyl-bike, but at 6-1", I don't fit into 600cc bike all-that-well.

And here is where imo the problems lay...The small bikes that you're legally bound to ride whilst on restricted license, only serve to teach people to rev-them-out at WOT to find power...So you find yourself "racing" around everywhere, because you "have" to...

The big-bore bikes allow you to ride in two distinct modes, cruise & fast...And because of the excellent power to be found everywhere, cruising around & riding lazily perhaps keeps you alive longer lol !

 

R2. 600's are all one needs imo. But at some stage, the 210-kmh top speed isn't enough, & so a 750cc bike is sought after that has more power "everywhere", & soon enough, the 230-240-kmph limit isn't enough lol...So next-up are the 1,000cc 4-cyl-bikes bikes, that now-days are knocking on that 300-kmph limited threshold...Once again, the beauty of the large-capacity machines is in there ability to allow you to ride in 2-modes, cruise & fast, with plenty-of-power accessible in any gear, at any road-speed. The 1,300cc 4-cyl-engines are just over-the-top...But that's evolution ;) !

 

R3. The water-sport-world is a strange thing, & a lot of phenomena that's unexpected presents itself...For example, due to the friction of water & hull shape / design, you won't go any faster with a massive engine fitted, than the "correct" sized engine fitted, due to drag, propeller-speeds, weight & other factors that limit everything. The "trick" to hi-po in the water is to be able to lift the hull fully out of the water...

 

R4. Small engines are a lot of fun, especially in the dirt-bike-world where I grew up in. It in all honesty, it took a Suzuki GSX-1100 4-cyl road-bike to give me similar throttle response, to any dirt-bike that I'd ridden in the past. Of course, it also provided a hell-of-a-lot-more road speed too LOL !

 



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Them two stroke dirt bikes RIP for such small CC's! It's really crazy, and the sound is like none other.

Havent been on a dirt bike for the better part of 30 years I'd say...

I've always wanted to rip into a big cafe bike 1100cc's or higher but I'm probably lucky I never did... at least not here in this city traffic.



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